The UK’s city-cycling hotspots

The UK has a long-standing love affair with cycling. In fact, there are over 7.5 million Brits who partake in the sport. And with city congestion making road travel as slow as ever, it’s becoming increasingly tempting to navigate the urban jungle on two wheels rather than four. But which UK towns and cities are the most cycle friendly?

We’ve conducted research, to determine the areas that see the fewest cycling accidents, endure the least bike thefts, enjoy the most manageable traffic, and demonstrate the most enthusiasm for the sport. With this data, we’ve managed to rank and reveal the UK’s city-cycling hotspots.

The UK’s top 15 cycling cities revealed

Leading the way as the UK’s top city for cycling, Cambridge comes away with an impressive index score of 3.248 out of 4.000. This is helped, in part, by the city outranking all other UK locations for cycling enthusiasm, far ahead Oxford and York who take second and third, respectively, for this category.

Oxford is also the overall runner up, placing as the second-best city across the UK for cycling, with an index score of 3.078. Next up, there’s clearly a cycling hub in the North-West, with Wigan (2.996), Stockport (2.965), and Bolton (2.953) each claiming places in the top five. In fact, Bolton and Wigan are also statistically the safest two towns to ride your bike, seeing fewer road accidents involving a cyclist than anywhere else in the UK.

Meanwhile, Stoke-on-Trent claims sixth on the list, with an overall index score of 2.936, followed by the South Yorkshire town of Barnsley (2.924). Interestingly, Barnsley is also the UK location that records the fewest bike thefts, followed by Rotherham and Plymouth.

In eighth, we head to the Lancashire coast and the seaside town of Blackpool, which comes in with an overall index score of 2.909, helped along the way by also being the place with the lowest amount of static or slow-moving traffic in the UK. Placing ninth, by the slimmest of margins, we have the northeast of England’s first representation, with Sunderland achieving an index score of 2.908, while Rotherham (2.900) takes tenth.

In 11th, we have Coventry (2.897), followed by West Yorkshire’s best cycling city in Bradford (2.896), which beats neighbouring Leeds considerably (placing 32nd nationwide). Rounding up the top 15 towns and cities for cycling, our index places Leicester (2.893) in 13th, Middlesbrough (2.883) in 14th, and Doncaster (2.876) in 15th.

Notably, London ranks lowest across each of our indexed cities, because of the intense city-wide traffic and high number of bike thefts (over ten times that of number one ranked Cambridge). Curiously, the cities of Hull, York, Bristol, and Brighton see more cycling accidents than any other, including the Capital.

Methodology

To index and rank each city, we first had to collect relevant cycling data, including the average cycling casualties per city, a city’s traffic rate, the cycling enthusiasm across the town and its people, and the recorded number of bike thefts within the area. 

After gathering the above data, we ordered each city for each category and assigned a score between 0.000-1.000 depending on position. To give a final index total, we combined all four category scores, giving an overall figure between 0.000-4.000. We then ordered each city, depending on its final index score to give us our top 15.

Cycling is a great way to exercise, socialise, and enjoy competition, and with countless beautiful routes running through the nation’s towns, cities, and countryside, the UK really is a biking haven. For even more interesting insight and the latest in our world, head on over to our blog.

Hit and Run Accidents Claims

When you have a road traffic accident, it can be bad enough. But if the accident was a hit and run, then it can make you feel even worse. You may not know where to turn, or if you can make a claim for hit and run accidents at all. However, The Compensation Experts are here to help.

There have been recent reports of hit and run accidents in the UK, involving both drivers and pedestrians. If you have a hit and run accident, there are certain rules you must follow. For example, you must report your accident to the police. You must do this when the accident happens, or soon after.

hit and run accidents

Motor Insurers Bureau Claims after Hit and Run Accidents

If the road accident was caused by an uninsured or untraced driver, you may still be able to make a claim. This claim is from the Motor Insurers Bureau

The Motor Insurers Bureau is an organisation that insurance companies pay into in an accident with these drivers. This would be the case if the accident was a hit and run accident. The Motor Insurers Bureau will then pay the compensation rather than the insurance company.

If you are hit by a car as a pedestrian and you did not get the details of the driver, you may also be able to make a claim for compensation from the Motor Insurers Bureau.

You can also make Motor Insurers’ Bureau claims if you have an accident involving a driver who is uninsured.

MIB Minor Injuries Claims

The Motor Insurers’ Bureau are also covered for claims following the whiplash reforms. They recently announced the launch of Official Injury Claim, a new free and official service for people who suffer road traffic accident related minor injuries, such as whiplash, to claim compensation without the need for legal representation.

Developed on behalf of the Ministry of Justice, this easy-to-use online service guides someone through the process of making a claim, obtaining a medical report, managing that claim and, if their claim is successful, receiving compensation.

They state that Official Injury Claim can be used for claims up to £5,000 for a personal injury, rising to a total of £10,000 for all losses related to the accident (such as loss of earnings and damage to your car and property).

A claim can be made if:

  • someone is aged 18 or over
  • the accident happened in England or Wales
  • the accident happened on or after the 31st May 2021
  • someone was inside a vehicle
  • someone believes the accident was not their fault

The new service has been built to make the claims process inclusive and accessible to as many people as possible.

How We Can Help with Claiming for Hit and Run Accidents

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience in personal injury claims. This includes hit and run accidents, and other uninsured or untraceable driver claims. Contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Accidents that Cause Deafblindness

Deafblindness is far more common than many people realise; around 400,000 people are affected by sight and hearing loss in the UK. Deafblindness is the loss of sight and hearing to the point where your communication, mobility, and ability to access information are impacted. This includes ‘progressive’ sight and hearing loss, where your sight and hearing may deteriorate over a period. Deafblindness is often also referred to as ‘dual sensory loss’ or ‘dual sensory impairment’. Accidents that cause deafblindness are likely to cause serious injuries.

Accidents that Cause Deafblindness

One of the most common types of injury that can cause deafblindness is head or brain injury. There are many causes of head injury. These include accidents at work, road traffic accidents as a driver, cyclist, motorcyclist, or pedestrian, and falling from height.

After an accident that causes deafblindness, you will almost certainly have to make drastic changes to your life. You may need modifications to your home, or may even have to move into assisted living, you may also have to give up both work and driving, and you may need assistance from a carer to complete day-to-day activities.

Accidents that cause deafblindness

Serious Injury Claims

Serious injuries can have a catastrophic effect on a person’s quality of life. Examples include brain injury, spinal cord injury, amputation, severe burns and blindness.

Anyone who sustains a serious injury will be facing a less-independent future in which they will require expert care and support. On a practical level, they may have to change jobs or give up work altogether which can place a strain on their finances. You may need specialist equipment such as wheelchairs, prosthetics or visual aids and you may need to make modifications to your home. Some injured persons will require 24-hour ongoing support.

No amount of compensation can reverse the impact of a serious injury but it can cover the cost of rehabilitation. Our panel of serious injury claims solicitors are on hand to ensure that you get all the care and support you need.

Claiming Compensation for Accidents that Cause Deafblindness

No two injuries are the same, therefore there is no one answer to how much compensation you could claim for an accident that causes deafblindness. However, there are guidelines that indicate how much you could potentially claim. These are the Judicial College Guidelines, and they estimate how much someone may be able to claim for injuries. The Judicial College Guidelines state that, for an accident that causes deafblindness, you could claim in the region of £322,060.

Claiming on behalf of someone else

If a loved one suffers an accident that causes deafblindness, they may be unable to make a claim for themselves. If a loved one is dependent on you, then you may be able to claim compensation on their behalf. The person who makes the claim on behalf of the injured person must be their next-of-kin.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with personal injury claims. This includes accidents that cause deafblindness. So contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Half of Brits Don’t Think E-Scooters Are Safe

They’re meant to be a fun and eco-friendly way to get around cities – and e-scooters are a big hit in the UK. E-scooter trials are currently ongoing in 32 areas across the UK, in everywhere from Somerset to Sunderland, and Halfords have reported a 184% rise in sales year on year. We’ve reported before about how UK law prohibits the use of privately-owned electric scooters on pavements and public roads, but these electronic vehicles are still prevalent across UK towns and cities.

As more and more cities embrace e-scooter trials, there have been a rising number of e-scooter accidents, often with tragic and fatal outcomes – so are Brits worried about the rise of e-scooters? To find out what the public really think, we surveyed 1500 Brits over the age of 18 to reveal their thoughts and opinions on e-scooters, and the results are telling.

Almost half of Brits (47%) don’t think that e-scooters are safe, and 60% of people think that they will cause more accidents. There are lots of concerns about the future of e-scooters, and the issues they could cause – find out what our research revealed about Brits’ thoughts on e-scooters.

E-Scooter speed limits

Rental e-scooters trials across the country have a maximum speed of 15.5mph, but the most powerful privately-owned e-scooters can reach speeds of up to 68mph – which perhaps explains why a significant 76% of Brits think we need to impose a speed limit on e-scooters. 60% of Brits also think e-scooters are more dangerous than bicycles, perhaps because average cycling speeds in the UK are between 12-15mph – well below the high speeds a privately-owned e-scooter can reach.

E-scooter licenses and tests

It remains effectively illegal to use a privately-owned e-scooter on any public road, pavement, cycle lane or in a public space, and they can only legally be used on private land. Nevertheless, e-scooters are still sold on the high street and online, and the lack of oversight may explain why 70% of Brits think E-scooters should be regulated by the government.

Though you do need a license to drive an e-scooter from an official trial, a provisional license gives you the license needed to drive an e-scooter – no test needed. Given the lack of oversight, and the potential danger of e-scooters on roads, it’s not surprising that 64% of Brits think that there should be a test before you can ride an e-scooter.

An e-scooter left on the street as part of a public trial.

Do e-scooters pose a danger to pedestrians?

While e-scooters are illegal to use on pavements, nevertheless, our survey revealed that Brits still have major safety concerns about the risk of pedestrian accidents. The majority of Brits (56%) don’t feel safe walking down the high street with e-scooters, and three-quarters (74%) of Brits don’t think e-scooters should ever be allowed on pedestrian paths.

One of the benefits of e-scooters is their eco-friendly nature – but their electronic motor, which is great for the environment, means that they run very quietly as well as very quickly, which is a real potential hazard for pedestrians. In particular, there are concerns about the impact on people with disabilities, especially as lots of e-scooters are illegally used on pavements which are already full of potential hazards for anyone with mobility issues, partial sightedness or a hearing impairment.

In fact, the Royal National Institute of Blind People have openly expressed concerns about e-scooter trials across the country. Even with the 15.5mph speed limit, they consider e-scooters to be a “real and genuine threat to the ability of blind and partially sighted people to move around independently and safely”. The British public overwhelmingly agree – 73% of Brits think that e-scooters should have audio warnings for people with disabilities.

It shouldn’t be overlooked that using e-scooters unsafely and illegally also poses a huge risk to the driver – there have been an unfortunate amount of fatal accidents for people driving e-scooters on busy roads. While the Met Police recommend that helmets should be worn while riding an e-scooter, this isn’t enshrined in law in the same way it is for motorcyclists. But 81.48% of Brits think you should have to wear a helmet when riding an e-scooter, to protect drivers from serious harm.

Views on e-scooters across the UK

Despite more than thirty ongoing trials of e-scooters in UK towns and cities, half of Brits think e-scooters should not be allowed in city centres, and the cautions and concerns are clear to see in places where e-scooter trials are taking place.

In the cities where e-scooter trials are underway, there’s a lot of public caution – 61% of people in Nottingham believe that e-scooters should be government regulated. Liverpool, allows e-scooter hire for £1 unlocking fee, plus a 20p per minute fee – and though the carbon-neutral scooters are capped at speeds of 10mph, with an extra cap of 5mph in busy areas, the sight of e-scooters on the road seems to have instilled a sense of caution in Liverpudlians: 80% pf people in Liverpool think you should wear a helmet riding an e-scooter.

It’s a similar story in London, which launched its own e-scooter trial in June 2021, but has seen plenty of e-scooters illegally driven on roads around the capital. The Daily Mail reports Met Police officers recently seized more than 100 e-scooters that had been driven illegally, contributing to serious injuries to riders and pedestrians. Perhaps it’s not surprising that three quarters of people in London think that there should be a speed limit imposed on all e-scooters.

Top tips for staying safe on e-scooters

Whether you’re using a public trial e-scooter or a privately-owned e-scooter on private property, you should always follow some basic safety tips. Here’s how to make sure you stay safe when riding an e-scooter.

1. Keep both hands on the handlebars at all times

It’s easy to get overconfident on an e-scooter. If you get a notification, it’s tempting to take a hand off the wheel and glance at your phone screen – but taking a hand off the handlebars can change your balance point, and easily lead to accidents!

2. Always wear protective equipment

It’s easy to think that because public trial e-scooters don’t go above 15mph, you won’t need protective equipment. But you can’t control other drivers, or account for human error on busy roads. You should always wear a helmet at the very least – it could be the difference between life and death.

3. Inspect your scooter before you ride

You should always check the battery, tire pressure, and brakes every time you hop on an e-scooter. Running out of charge at a busy intersection or riding on underinflated tires could cause a serious accident.

4. Don’t double up on an e-scooter

E-scooters are made for one person – there’s not enough room on standard electric scooters for two people, but that doesn’t stop people from riding tandem. E-scooters have a set weight limit, so if you’re over that limit and crash, you’re likely to be liable!

How can we help?

E-scooters are clearly a concern for the British public, and as their popularity continues to rise, pedestrians and motorists across the UK will continue to have plenty of apprehensions about their safety. We are experts in personal injury compensation and road traffic accidents, so if you’ve been involved in an accident with an e-scooter, get in touch for expert advice and find out how we can help you get the compensation you deserve. For more of the latest guidance and information, head to our blog for more news

E-Scooter Rider and Passenger Suffer Serious Injuries After E-scooter Accident

Police are investigating a crash between an E-scooter and a vehicle in Wolverhampton. The crash left the e-scooter rider and a passenger with serious injuries. The rider of the E-scooter and a passenger are both in hospital after the e-scooter accident.

Police appealed for help in a statement released after the accident:

‘We’re appealing for witnesses after a man riding an e-scooter was critically injured in a collision with a car in Wolverhampton. The 20-year-old man riding the e-scooter was taken to hospital to be treated for a serious head injury, while a woman, aged 19, believed to have been a passenger on the e-scooter was also seriously injured. The woman driving the car was not hurt.

‘Officers are carrying out CCTV and house-to-house enquires and are appealing for anyone who saw what happened or who has dashcam or other footage, to get in touch’.

News of the incident comes amid a rise in popularity of electric scooters, also known as e-scooters. The e-scooters top speed is typically 25mph, though some can reach double that. Under current legislation, it is illegal to ride privately owned e-scooters on public roads, pavements, or cycle lanes. In the cities that have the e-scooter trials, people who have rented the scooters can ride them on roads only, and cycle lanes.

e-scooter accident

E-Scooter Accidents

Many cities in the UK are now holding trials of e-scooters. However, there have been reports of accidents in other cities. The latest figures show that more than 70 people have been injured in accidents involving e-scooters. Transport bosses have suggested that e-scooters could be 100 times more dangerous than bicycles, while campaigners insist that they are terrorising people on pavements.

Due to the fact that E-scooters must meet the same standards as motor vehicles, if you have an accident involving an electric scooter then you may be able to make a claim. This is true if you are riding an e-scooter or if an e-scooter hits you as a passenger.

If you have an electric scooter accident as a passenger then you may be able to make a claim. You may also be able to make a claim if you were riding an e-scooter and you have an accident involving a car. There are other examples where the person riding the scooter is uninsured or untraceable. In these cases, you may still be able to make a claim. The Motor Insurers’ Bureau deal with compensation claims for people who have accidents with uninsured or untraceable drivers.

How we can Help if You Have Had an E-Scooter Accident

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with personal injury claims. This includes electric scooter accidents. If you have had an e-scooter accident, contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Which cars have the most distracting in-car entertainment systems?

Astonishingly, there are over 12,000 road traffic accidents each year caused by some form of impairment or distraction. This comes as it’s also revealed that you’re twice as likely to have a crash while texting than drink driving. But do our cars contribute at all to the difficulty in maintaining concentration? We’ve revealed the best and worst models for helping you to keep focus behind the wheel, as well as our top tips to avoid distraction on the road.

Revealed: the cars to avoid for distracting driving

To determine the most distracting in-car entertainment system, 20 models were tested and scored out of 30 in a recent study by Whatcar? This total combined six scoring factors, including how easy it is to alter settings and user-accessibility*.

Analysing the results, there’s no model with a more distracting interface than the MG ZS EV (12). The MG car scored lowly across most categories, only redeemed slightly by the conveniently large and operational air-con dials. Scoring similarly poorly, you should also aim to steer away from the Fiat 500X (14) and Skoda Citigo-e iV (16), for a distraction-free driving experience. Rounding off the worst five cars, we also have the Peugeot 508 SW (17) and the Lexus RX (18).

At the other end of the scale, the BMW 3 Series gets full marks in almost all scoring categories; it offers the least distracting infotainment system, with an impressive test score of 28/30. Joint second, we have the Mercedez-Benz CLA (27) and the Porsche Panamera E-Hybrid (27), while the Audi Q3 Sportback (26) and Mazda3 (25) complete the top five.

We’ve outlined the complete ranking order below:

RankBrandCar systemPoints
1MGMG ZS EV with 8.0in touchscreen12
2Fiat500X with 7-inch touchscreen and Uconnect Live14
3SkodaCitigo-e iV with colour screen and phone holder16
4Peugeot508 SW with 10-inch Connected 3D Navigation and voice recognition17
5LexusRX with 12.3-inch multimedia display18
6HondaCR-V with 7-inch touchscreen, Honda Connect and Garmin navigation18
7NissanJuke with Nissan Connect19
8ToyotaCorolla with Touch 2 media system and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto20
9VolvoS60 with Sensus20
10JaguarXE with 10-inch Touch Pro Duo system21
11Skoda (premium)Kamiq with 9.2-inch touchscreen, voice control and Amundsen sat-nav21
12VauxhallCorsa with 10-inch Multimedia Navi Pro22
13HyundaiIoniq with 10.25-inch touchscreen and Bluelink connectivity22
14FordFiesta with Sync 3 navigation and FordPass Connect23
15VolkswagenPassat GTE with 8-inch Composition Media system24
16MazdaMazda3 with 8.8-inch colour display and Mazda Connect25
17AudiQ3 Sportback with Virtual Cockpit Plus26
18PorschePanamera E-Hybrid with Connect Plus and Porsche Communication Management27
19Mercedes-BenzCLA with 10.25-inch touchscreen27
20BMW3 Series with Live Cockpit Professional28

Top tips for avoiding distractions while driving

Collaborating with driving instructor John Parry from Parrys Fleet Services, we’ve provided our top tips to follow to avoid distraction while on the road:

1. Put your device away

To avoid temptation while driving, place your mobile device out of sight and out of reach, ideally in the glove box or tucked away in a bag.

2. Know where you’re going

If you’re using a navigation system for directions, make sure to input the destination before you set off, rather than mid-journey.

3. Ask passengers for help

If you’re driving with somebody else in the passenger seat, don’t be afraid to ask for help to navigate, make a call, or send a message.

4. Pull over

If you must make a call or send a message while driving, make sure to first pull off the road safely and stop.

5. Be a good passenger

If you’re in the passenger seat, keep alert to any distractions or dangers your driver may not have noticed. Don’t be afraid to speak up if you spot something.

6. Don’t be a distraction

If you know that a friend or family member is driving, avoid calling or texting them. Even if they’ve put their phone aside, they may be distracted by a ping or ring.

7. Activate do not disturb

Turning on the ‘Do not disturb’ feature on your Apple or Android device will prevent calls from coming in while you’re driving.

Our top tips aren’t just suited to drivers; pedestrians and cyclists should also make every effort to avoid distractions. This means you should never text, call, or play games while walking or cycling.

Methodology

Rankings were gained from a recent What Car? study

To rank each of the 20 types of car brands, What Car rated each on six different scoring elements. Each element was worth an equal five points. These were:

  1. Turn up the temperature by two degrees.
  2. Increase the fan speed by two settings.
  3. With a 20-mile route programmed into the satnav and the infotainment screen on the home page, go to the map screen and zoom out to see the entire route.
  4. Cancel route guidance.
  5. With the radio tuned to Virgin Radio DAB, and the infotainment screen on the home page, go to the main list of DAB stations and switch to BBC Radio 4.
  6. Using the voice control button on the steering wheel (if fitted), ask the car to find the nearest service station.

With some cars noticeably worse than others for distracting you from the road ahead, whether through dashboard difficulty or complicated controls, it’s important to consider how your vehicle affects your driving safety. For even more helpful advice and expertise, head on over to our blog.

Brain Injury Awareness Week

This week (17th-23rd May) is action on brain injury week, hosted by the charity Headway. There is a different theme every year, and the theme of this year’s campaign is A Life of Lockdown. It sets out to highlight the effects of lockdown and isolation during the recovery period of suffering an injury.

Brain injuries are often serious injuries and so can mean your life can change drastically. You may require modifications to your home or vehicle or may have to give up work. In some cases, people who suffer them may require support from a carer.

Causes of Brain Injury

There are a number of causes of brain injury with varying levels of severity. Some of these include:

If you or a loved one have suffered a brain injury and it was someone else’s fault, then you may be able to claim compensation.

Effects of Brain Injury

A brain injury can have a wide range of effects. While many people recover quickly after a minor head injury, this is not always the case and people may experience longer-term effects. 

The more severe the injury, the longer-term and more pronounced the effects are likely to be. Some people may spend time in a coma, or experience a more prolonged reduced awareness state. During the early stages of recovery, brain injury survivors often go through a stage where they have no continuous memory of day-to-day events. Their behaviour may also be very uncharacteristic and confused. 

A brain injury can cause behavioural and emotional changes, hormonal imbalances, difficulties with cognition and memory, a range of communication problems, physical effects and, very commonly, fatigue. 

brain injury

Claiming on Behalf of Someone Else

Many brain injuries mean that the person who suffered them may not be able to make a claim for themselves. This may be due to the injury meaning they do not have the mental capability to make a claim. In cases where this happens, the person’s next of kin, or a person who is legally allowed to, such as someone who has power of attorney, will be able to make a claim on their behalf.

In circumstances where a loved one dies from their brain injury, the next of kin can also make a claim on their behalf if it was someone else’s fault.

We know that, when a loved one suffers a serious injury such as a brain injury, the last thing you may be thinking about is making a claim. However, the solicitors we work with can help with the stress of the financial impact that an injury like this can have.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accidents that cause brain injury. So contact us by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

What Are Serious Injury Compensation Claims?

A serious injury is usually life changing. It can alter your life physically and may also impact you mentally. Specialist care and support may become necessary, and you may also have to rethink your employment, living arrangements, personal care, and daily activities. For some people, serious injury will put an end to their working lives. This is why serious injury compensation claims are important.

Some common examples of serious injuries include:

  • Amputations
  • Brain and head injuries
  • Paralysis
  • Injuries to internal organs
  • Burns and skin damage
  • Back and spinal injuries

Any type of accident has the potential to cause catastrophic injury, therefore causes of serious injuries can be varied and can include motorcycle accidents, falls from height, public accidents, accidents at work and road traffic accidents.

Making a Serious Injury Compensation Claim

We understand that after you have had an accident, especially a serious accident, the last thing you may want to do is make a claim. However, anyone who sustains a serious injury will be facing a less-independent future in which they will require expert care and support. On a practical level, they may have to change jobs or give up work altogether which can place a strain on their finances. Specialist equipment such as wheelchairs, prosthetics or visual aids may be needed, and modifications may need to be made to the family home. Some injured persons will require 24-hour ongoing support. The solicitors we work with can help you cover some of the financial costs associated with a serious injury. These costs include:

  • Continuing treatments such as physiotherapy
  • Rehabilitation
  • Mobility aids
  • Changes to your home or vehicle
  • Other equipment that can make life easier
  • Loss of earnings

Are There Any Time Limits for Making Serious Injury Compensation Claims?

Court proceedings for serious injury claims must be issued within three years of the accident or the date on which you became aware that you had suffered a serious injury as a result of the accident if this is later.

For children, the three-year period does not start to run until the child’s 18th birthday.

Can Serious Injury Claims Be Made on Behalf of Someone Else?

If the injuries are too serious for a person to bring their own claim, perhaps due to brain injury, then a claim may be made on their behalf. Such Claimants are known as “protected parties.”

The person who makes a claim on behalf of a protected party is called a “litigation friend.” The litigation friend will be responsible for conducting the claim and negotiating the compensation settlement in the best interests of the protected party. In cases of incapacity, the three-year window for making a claim does not start to run until the injured person recovers the ability to conduct litigation for themselves.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with personal injury claims. This includes serious injury claims. So contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Launch of campaign to reduce motorcycle collisions

Dorset police and Dorset Road Safe Partnership are working together, along with DocBike, to try and reduce motorcycle collisions this Spring. This comes after reports show that, in Dorset, per mile travelled, more motorcyclists die or are critically injured than any other road user. Nationally, approximately 10 motorcyclists are killed or seriously injured every day.

 In an effort to prevent road deaths across the county, the scheme is encouraging all road users to take that extra bit of time, particularly at junctions, and THINK BIKE! The campaign which is called ‘Think Bike, Have You Been Seen’, runs from 1st April until 31st October 2021. It will see unique road signs in key locations where many motorcyclists have had accidents in Dorset to date. 

An Inspector from Dorset Police stated: “Every year motorcycle fatalities peak throughout the spring and summer time. This is likely due to the better weather encouraging riders to travel more readily on two wheels.  The causes of collisions are a mixture of rider error and drivers not looking properly.”

Motorcycle Collisions

Nearly three-quarters of all motorcycle accidents involve a car, van, or lorry. In motorcycle accidents the lack of vehicle protection leaves riders incredibly vulnerable to catastrophic injury. Even the most responsible rider may have an accident which was not their fault.

The biggest reason behind compensation claims for motorbike accidents, accounting for nearly two-thirds, is the driver of the other vehicle ignoring the motorcyclist’s right of way either because they have not seen the motorcycle until it is too late, or because they are unaware of the laws about motorcyclists rights on the roads.

Some of the most common examples of motorcycle injury claims are:

  • Fractures
  • Whiplash
  • Head and spinal injuries
  • Fatalities

Road Traffic Accident or Motor Insurance Bureau Claim?

If you have an accident whilst on a motorcycle and you did not get the details of the driver, you may still be able to make a claim from the Motor Insurers Bureau. The Motor Insurers Bureau is an organisation that insurance companies pay into in the event of an accident with an uninsured or untraced driver. This would be the case if the driver drove away or they were uninsured. You must report your accident to the police at the time of the accident, or soon afterwards. The Motor Insurance Bureau will then pay the compensation rather than the insurance company.

How we can help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with personal injury claims. This includes road traffic accidents involving motorcycles. Contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Electric Scooter Accidents and the Law

Electric scooters have become increasingly popular over the past few years across Europe, and, more recently, the UK. This is largely due to the fact that they are easy to use, portable and environmentally friendly. However, the laws around these scooters are widely unknown, and this can lead to electric scooter accidents.

Electric Scooter Laws

Electric scooters, or E-scooters as they are more commonly known, are common in scooter shares around Europe. This is when a person rents the scooter and is able to use it for a certain amount of time. Whilst there are a couple of cities in the UK that are also piloting the scheme, notably Bristol, Bath and London, most E-scooters in the UK are privately owned. This therefore makes them illegal to use on anything other than private land.

Scooters in the UK are classified as “powered transporters”. This means that they fall under the same legislation as motor vehicles. They would therefore need to meet the same standards under the Road Traffic Act 1988 to be legalised in public. They must be insured, registered with the DVLA and taxed. To use an E scooter on private land, you don’t need to have a valid license or insurance. They are not legal for use on public roads. 

As it stands if you’re caught using a privately-owned electric scooter on public land, you’re liable to receive a £300 fine, 6 points on your license and the possibility of having your scooter confiscated.

When using a rental E scooter as part of the trials, The Met Police have also said that fines and penalty points will be distributed for actions reflecting the laws around driving a motor vehicle. These include:

  • jumping a red light
  • riding on the pavement
  • using a mobile phone
  • surpassing the E scooter speed limit

Electric Scooter Accidents

Due to the fact that E-scooters must meet the same standards as motor vehicles, if you have an accident involving an electric scooter then you may be able to make a claim. If the accident was caused by the person riding the electric scooter, then they may be to blame for the accident.

If you have an electric scooter accident as a passenger then you may be able to make a claim. This is because scooters are not legally allowed to be on public pavements, so they would be to blame for the accident. There are other examples where the person riding the scooter is uninsured or untraceable. In these cases, you may still be able to make a claim. The Motor Insurers’ Bureau was set up especially to deal with compensation claims for people who have had accidents involving uninsured or untraceable drivers.

How we can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes electric scooter accidents and other types of road accidents. Contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Cyclists Rights on Roads

Cycling is a travel option that divides a lot of people. On the one hand, it is better for the environment and our health, but on the other hand some people argue that cyclists do not follow the rules of the road, and have a disregard of their and others rights. You may think that cyclists rights on the roads are different than vehicles because they do not have to pay the same road tax. That is not true, cyclists rights on the roads are essentially the same as vehicles rights on the roads.

Cyclists Rights on Roads

Cyclists have the same rights on the roads as other road users, but they also have other rules. For example, at a junction, cyclists are usually permitted to go ahead of vehicles to stop at traffic lights.

Cyclists can use the full width of the lane as much as anyone else. They are also allowed to ride two abreast. Cyclists do not have to use the designated cycle lane on the roads. However, cyclists are encouraged to ride single file where possible to avoid collisions.

Bicycles do not have to have a bell fitted by law. The law states that calling out to give a warning is sufficient. The only equipment that a bicycle must legally have are reflectors and working brakes, plus front and rear lights if the cyclist intends to bike at night. However, the Highway Code does advise consideration of pedestrians in this, and whilst calling out may be acceptable, a bell may be more socially considerate.

Lane Splitting

Lane splitting, when cyclists undertake and overtake cars and change lanes in order to move through traffic faster, is perfectly legal.

The Highway Code states that road users should be aware of others when travelling. It also mentions cyclists should avoid filtering in and out of traffic if it could cause conflict with another person. An example of this is when approaching a junction. Overtaking is the safest way to do this, as it is generally less dangerous than undertaking.

Speed Limits

Unlike vehicles, there is no speed limit for cyclists on the roads. However, some local authorities do impose speed limits for cyclists. They must also follow a speed limit in the Royal parks.

Although speeding is not an offence in itself, cyclists who cycle dangerously are committing an offence under section 28 of the Road Traffic Act 1988. This means that they can face fines of up to £2500. Careless cycling is also an offence under section 29 of the Road Traffic Act 1988. This is when a cyclist uses the road without due care and attention for other road users. A cyclist doing this may face a fine of up to £1000.

The Most Common Causes of Cycling Accidents

Accidents involving cyclists can happen for all sorts of reasons. However, in our experience, the most common causes of cycling accident claims include:

  • Hit and run road traffic accidents.
  • Collision with a car, vehicle or even another cyclist or a pedestrian.
  • Vehicle doors opening into the path of an oncoming cyclist.
  • Potholes, worn tarmac, raised manhole covers and other defects in the road.
  • Any slippery road conditions due to oil spills, ice and snow.

Many cyclists don’t realise that if an accident was someone else’s fault, a cyclist can claim compensation.

Who Is at Fault for Cycling Accidents?

There are instances in cycling accidents where the cyclist may be at fault, and there are instances where it may be someone else’s fault. instances where a cyclist may be at fault include not wearing high visibility clothing, not having lights on their bike, cycling whilst under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or cycling carelessly. If a cyclist has not followed the rules set out in The Highway Code, then they may also be at fault.

Cyclists Rights on Roads: How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience in all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accidents on the road involving cyclists. Contact us today by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Reporting Your Accident

No matter the type of accident you have, reporting your accident is important. It is important for a number of reasons, including for proof of your accident happening. Other reasons include: so the other party knows the accident happened, loss of earnings due to taking time off work, medical reasons, and to ensure it does not happen again.

According to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) more than 14,000 people die as a result of accidents every year, with thousands more having injuries.

Reporting Your Accident at Work

If you have an accident at work, it is important to report the accident to your employer. In workplaces where there is an accident book, you must make sure you log the accident in there. If not, you must report the accident verbally to a manager or supervisor.

When reporting your accident at work, it is important to note down the date and time of the accident, the cause of the accident, whether there were any witnesses, the treatment you had, and the amount of time you had to take off work.

Reporting Your Accident in a Public Place

Having an accident in a public place may mean that there are a few people that you need to think about when reporting your accident. If you fell in a shop, you need to report your accident to the shop owner or manager. Most shops will also have an accident book or form, so it is important to fill that in too.

If you have an accident on the street, for example, a trip on the pavement, then you will need to report your accident to the council. However, if the council have sent you a claims form, it is important that you do not fill that in and send back if you would like to make a personal injury claim. Nevertheless, the council does need to know about any defects in pavements or roads, so it is still important to report your accident.

Reporting Your Accident on the Road

If you have an accident on the road, for example, a road traffic accident, there are a couple of people you may need to think about reporting your accident to. You must report the accident to your insurance, and take the details of the other person involved in the accident. This is usually their name, registration number and insurance details.

You may also need to report your accident to the police. This is almost always the case in road traffic accidents, as the police are usually called to the scene. If they are not, it is still important to report your accident to them.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts, we work with solicitors who have years of experience in dealing with all types of personal injury claims. This includes accidents at work, accidents in public places, and accidents on the road. Contact us today by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.