Children’s Cycling Accidents: Risk may Increase in Warmer Weather

Now that the weather is improving, it is natural that children and adults alike may want to get out cycling. However, with more people around comes the heightened risk of children’s cycling accidents. There are some incidents where there may be an accident involving children where it is just that, an accident. However, if your child has had an accident where someone is to blame, then you may be able to claim compensation on their behalf.

Common Causes of Children’s Cycling Accidents

Many children have cycling accidents due to a variety of reasons. Some of these include:

  • Hit and run accidents
  • Cycling accidents in public areas such as skateparks and parks
  • Accidents due to defects in playgrounds and pavements
  • Slippery road or pavement conditions
  • Collisions with other cyclists or pedestrians

If your child has had a cycling accident due to one of these reasons, then it may be someone else’s fault and you may be able to make a claim on their behalf.

Children's cycling accidents

Minimising Risks of Children’s Cycling Accidents

The nature of children means that they may have accidents that there is no one to blame for. There are certain ways that you can minimise your child’s risk of having an accident by taking certain precautions. Here are a few tips from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) on how you can maximise the enjoyment and minimise the risk:

  • Carry out a regular safety check (tyres at the correct pressure, brakes working and nothing loose like spokes, saddle or handlebars)
  • Wearing a cycle helmet will help provide protection to the head in the event of a collision or falling off (remember to replace if damaged)
  • Make sure your child is not wearing any loose clothing or shoelaces, which could become tangled in the chain or wheels
  • Parents should ride with children to their competence and ability. Get them to demonstrate that they can safely control their bike and deal with other traffic
  • For older children, if they are riding away from home plan the route with them; use cycle tracks and avoid busy roads and junctions if possible.

Claiming on Behalf of a Child

If a child is injured in an accident, then a parent or guardian may be able to make a claim on their behalf. The time limits are also different when making a claim on behalf of a child. Ordinarily a person would have three years from the date of the accident to make a claim. This is different when claiming for a child.

In the case of a child’s accident, you have until they turn 18 to make a claim on their behalf. They then have three years from the date they turn 18 to make a claim. So, in theory, you may have a longer time in which to make a claim. however, it is always better to start a potential claim as soon as possible.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts, we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes children’s cycling accidents. Contact us by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Home accidents: The UK’s hidden household dangers

From hot hobs and sharp counter edges to electrical sockets and loose wires, your house is full of potential dangers for children. In fact, according to a new report by The Compensation Experts, an astonishing 67,135 children were admitted to hospital in 2020 due to injuries sustained at home.

Reading on, we reveal the safety features UK parents most commonly neglect, the most dangerous rooms in the house for children, and our top tips for keeping kids safe.

Uncovering the most common household accidents

Children are inquisitive, crafty, and playful, so it’s only natural that they find themselves in risky situations, especially when left to their own devices. To avoid catastrophe, it’s important to put basic protective measures in place to prevent your children from hurting themselves. However, after questioning 1,000 UK parents about their protective habits, it’s clear that not all mums and dads get around to installing the appropriate equipment.

For example, as many as half of parents have never positioned a safeguard over a hot hob to protect little one from burning their fingers, while over four-in-ten (42%) have never installed corner guards. Unfortunately, these measures should, perhaps, be treated with a little more gravitas, as, in 2020, a reported 16% of children suffered serious burns and 27% experienced bumped heads off table edges.

Staggeringly, a further 41% of parents claim to have disregarded the danger of open cupboards and drawers, which led to 13% of children consuming a dangerous detergent pod in 2020. Similarly, 40% of UK parents actively ignore notoriously hazardous plug sockets, even though 13% of children injure themselves annually while meddling with live electrics.

Finally, children can be clumsy, so it should come as no surprise that 33% and 23% of youngsters, respectively, tumbled down the stairs or fell out of their crib, on at least one occasion in 2020. However, with just 37% of mums and dads committed to installing stair gates and only 34% putting up protective bed barriers, there’s plenty of room for parents to be doing much more to keep their children safer.

Revealed: the most dangerous rooms in the house

Despite often being designed for comfortable lounging, UK parents have named the living room as the most dangerous room in the house; perhaps surprisingly, a startling 42% of children experienced injury here in 2020. Heading outside, the garden also poses danger for unsupervised children, with over a third more (37%) hurting themselves while playing.

Positioned as the third most dangerous area of the house for unsuspecting youngsters, the bedroom saw a third (32%) of children hurt themselves through banging, falling, or tripping in 2020. Meanwhile, sharp corner edges and swinging cupboard doors in the kitchen are responsible for 30% of children heading to the hospital through household injury.

At the other end of the table, hallways (24%), bathrooms (21%), and garages (13%) are considered to be among the least dangerous areas of the house, according to parents, with each responsible for sending less than a quarter of unwary children to A&E in 2020.

Injury prevention top tips

A lot of accidents in the home can easily be avoided, by taking suitable precautions. We’ve outlined our top five injury prevention tips to keep your children safe.

1. Cupboard safety locks

These inexpensive plastic locks will prevent children from opening cupboards and trapping their fingers. These locks also stop children from accessing anything dangerous when you’re not around to keep an eye out.

2. Hob safeguard

Place childproof covers on oven hobs and stoves to prevent nasty burns. Similarly, if you’re cooking on the hob, make sure all handles are facing away from the front to avoid curious children from tipping over a bubbling pan.

3. Electric plug sockets guard

Keep all cables out of reach and insert plastic socket covers to prevent your child from touching electrical outlets.

4. Rubber corner guard

Work surface and table corner points are often head height for an inquisitive youngster. To prevent head bumps and eye injuries, childproof all sharp corner edges with rubber corner guards.

5. Baby gate

Installing baby gates is an efficient way of stopping children from wandering into a room on their own. Having a baby gate allows you to rest easy, knowing your child is safe and out of harm’s way.

Keeping children safe from household danger can be difficult, especially if you’re working throughout the day, but hopefully you’ve picked up a few helpful tips for preventing home-based injuries. For even more expert advice and interesting insight, explore the latest news on our blog.

Easter Accidents in Public

With the Easter weekend just around the corner, many people will be looking forward to being able to meet people outside again. However, with the long weekend comes a long weekend of walking, which can lead to a rise in Easter weekend accidents in public places such as parks, in children’s play areas and on pavements.

Easter accidents in public

There are a few accidents that can happen over the Easter weekend. Some of these accidents include: slips or trips on pavements whilst out walking, accidents on children’s playgrounds due to faulty or broken playground equipment, and road traffic accidents. And because we can now meet other people outside, accidents in public places may even increase.

Pavement accidents

The most common type of public accidents are slips, trips and falls. These accidents can happen on the pavement, on the road or on public footpaths in parks. They are usually caused by potholes or defects in the ground.

There are certain rules when claiming for tripping on a pothole or defect in a pavement or road. On a pavement, a pothole or defect must be at least an inch deep or raised. In the road, this must be at least 2 inches deep and at least 12 inches wide.

Playground accidents

With many children on their Easter break from school, going to a playground during Easter weekend may be common. If a child has an accident on a playground due to faulty or broken playground equipment, then you may be able to make a claim on their behalf.

The Responsibility of Local Authorities

The Highways Act 1980 states that local authorities are responsible for keeping all roads and footpaths safe to use. Keeping all roads and pavements marble smooth at all times is both unnecessary and impractical. However a council has a legal duty to repair any damage that occurs to surfaces. They must do this by making repairs within six months of being notified of the risk. If a local council does not do this and someone has an accident, then they may be liable.

Road traffic accidents

If you have had a road traffic accident because of someone else’s carelessness on the road, then you may be able to claim compensation.

When you have a road traffic accident, your injuries can be severe. They can range from whiplash and soft tissue damage, to more serious injuries. In the worst cases, they can even be fatal. Even the smallest injuries can take a while to heal after a road traffic accident.

You may have to take time off work to recover, and therefore lose out financially. Your car may have also suffered some damage, and you may even have to replace it. If all of this happened in an accident that was not your fault, then it can be even worse.

How we can help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accidents in public places and on the roads. Contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

What Are Public Liability Accidents?

Public liability accidents are accidents where a public entity is liable for the accident. This is commonly the council. The accidents usually happen on the street, on the roads and in public places such as parks. Accidents in shops and supermarkets do not fall under public liability, as they are privately owned. Therefore, they are occupier’s liability.

Public Liability Accidents

The most common type of public liability accidents are slips, trips and falls. These accidents can happen on the pavement, on the road or on public footpaths in parks. They are usually caused by potholes or defects in the ground.

There are certain rules when claiming for tripping on a pothole or defect in a pavement or road. On a pavement, a pothole or defect must be at least an inch deep or raised. In the road, this must be at least 2 inches deep and at least 12 inches wide.

The Responsibility of Local Authorities

The Highways Act 1980 states that local authorities are responsible for keeping all roads and footpaths safe to use. Keeping all roads and pavements marble smooth at all times is both unnecessary and impractical. However a council has a legal duty to repair any damage that occurs to surfaces. They must do this by making repairs within six months of being notified of the risk. If a local council does not do this and someone has an accident, then they may be liable.

If You Have Had A Public Liability Accident

When you have an accident due to a defect in the road or pavement, it is important that you take photos of the defect. This will help with your case, as it can be proof of the defect in a claim. If you have an accident and you have information about the defect, then it can be helpful to note this down too. Details include how long the defect has been there, how often the local council repair defects, and if other people have had accidents in the same place. If the accident was previously reported, how long it took the council to fix the defect, and if they actually did fix it.

It is important that you report the defect to the council so that they are aware of the defect. They also need to be aware so that they can fix any defects. However, if you wish to make a personal injury claim, you should not try and claim directly with the council. This is because if you have already tried to claim from the council and they deny liability, then it is unlikely that they will accept liability if you start a personal injury claim.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience in all manner of personal injury claims. This includes slips trips and falls in public places. Contact us today by filling in our contact form or by calling us on 0800 182 2185 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

What Are Occupier’s Liability Accidents?

Any private premises in the UK has an owner; someone who is responsible for keeping people who visit the premises safe. Private premises can be anything from shops to car parks. Occupier’s liability is the area of law that deals with this duty of care and occupier’s liability accidents. It concerns anyone who owns a property that the public can visit.

The Difference Between Occupier’s Liability and Public Liability

Occupier’s liability refers to anyone who owns a property that the public can visit. Due to this, they are sometimes wrongly referred to as public liability accidents. However, the difference is in the owner of the place where the accident happened. Public liability generally covers places that the council own and are responsible for. Occupier’s liability covers places that are privately owned.

Occupier’s Liability Accidents

The types of accidents that generally come under occupier’s liability accidents include accidents in shops, supermarkets, car parks, restaurants, and private residences. Owners of properties must take steps to help ensure that people do not have accidents on their premises.

There are many causes of accidents that fall under occupier’s liability. Some of these include:

  • Slipping on wet surfaces
  • Tripping over uneven floors or obstacles left in walkways
  • Being struck by a falling object, such as an item falling from a shelf
  • Accidents in car parks due to poor layouts or bad lighting
  • Malfunctioning lifts and automatic doors

These causes of accidents are easy to avoid. The owner of the premises should ensure that they put measures in place to avoid accidents like this from happening. They must ensure they follow rules set out in the Occupiers Liability Act 1957 to minimise the risk of accidents happening. If they fail to do this then they may be liable if someone has an accident on their premises.

Children and Occupier’s Liability Accidents

Some of the more common occupier’s liability accidents involve children. If children are visiting a place that falls under occupier’s liability, then the owner must take extra care to minimise the risk of children having accidents. This is because children tend to be less careful than adults whilst out in public.

If your child has had an accident is a public or private place, then you may be able to claim on their behalf. If your child is under 18, then a parent or guardian may make a claim for them. Their parent or guardian also has until the child turns 18 to make a claim. If the child is over 18 then they have until they are 21 to make a claim themselves.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who deal with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accidents in private places. This means that they have the expertise to help you with your potential claim. Contact us today by filling in our contact form or by calling us on 0800 182 2185 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

What is the Difference Between Raynaud’s and Vibration White Finger?

Raynaud’s Phenomenon is a common condition that does not usually cause any problems. However, people often confuse it with Vibration White Finger. The difference between Raynaud’s and Vibration White Finger is that VWF is actually a secondary form of Raynaud’s syndrome that is caused by prolonged us of vibrating tools.

Vibration White Finger is also known as Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS). People have developed HAVS as a result of prolonged exposure to intense vibration tools over a long period of time.

The Difference Between Raynaud’s and Vibration White Finger

Vibration White Finger, also known as Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) is a secondary form of Raynaud’s Phenomenon. It usually affects those who work with, or have worked with, vibrating tools over a long period of time.

There are a few things that can cause confusion between the two conditions. The main reason people think that Raynaud’s and Vibration White Finger are the same condition is because of the two having similar symptoms.

The symptoms of Raynaud’s include:

  • Pain
  • Numbness
  • Pins and needles
  • Difficulty moving the affected area

The symptoms of Vibration White Finger include:

  • Whitening or blanching of the fingertips
  • Numbness and tingling in the fingers or hands
  • Cysts in finger and wrist bones
  • Lack of dexterity or grip strength
  • Loss of sensitivity of touch

The two conditions can also be worse in the cold. Vibration White Finger has the same symptoms as Raynaud’s with added ones on top of it.

Causes of Vibration White Finger

Vibration White Finger is caused by the use of vibrating tools over a long period of time. This can be a part of your job, but if you did not have the adequate protection whilst at work and you have Vibration White Finger, then you may be able to make a claim.

Some of the tools that can give off enough vibration to cause VWF include: jackhammers, grinders, breakers, jigsaws, and hand held power tools. This list is not exhaustive, ad any power tool has the potential to cause VWF.

As people who use power tools for a living will be particularly susceptible to VWF as they are using them on a daily basis for long periods of time, employers have a duty to inform employees of the risks associated with the work and to provide adequate safety equipment, such as vibration-absorbing gloves.

Other ways to help prevent VWF include:

  • Taking regular breaks from using vibrating tools
  • Ensuring tools have a regular maintenance schedule and are in good order
  • Undertaking training to ensure you are using tools in the correct way

What to do if you think you have Vibration White Finger

If you think you may have Vibration White Finger, the first thing you should do is make an appointment with your GP to get a diagnosis of the condition. The next thing you should do is make a note of the companies you worked for and how long you worked at each one, the tools you used and the average amount of time you used them per day. This information will help you if you wish to make a claim for VWF.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of industrial disease claims. This includes Vibration White Finger. Contact us today by filling in out contact form or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Cyclists Rights on Roads

Cycling is a travel option that divides a lot of people. On the one hand, it is better for the environment and our health, but on the other hand some people argue that cyclists do not follow the rules of the road, and have a disregard of their and others rights. You may think that cyclists rights on the roads are different than vehicles because they do not have to pay the same road tax. That is not true, cyclists rights on the roads are essentially the same as vehicles rights on the roads.

Cyclists Rights on Roads

Cyclists have the same rights on the roads as other road users, but they also have other rules. For example, at a junction, cyclists are usually permitted to go ahead of vehicles to stop at traffic lights.

Cyclists can use the full width of the lane as much as anyone else. They are also allowed to ride two abreast. Cyclists do not have to use the designated cycle lane on the roads. However, cyclists are encouraged to ride single file where possible to avoid collisions.

Bicycles do not have to have a bell fitted by law. The law states that calling out to give a warning is sufficient. The only equipment that a bicycle must legally have are reflectors and working brakes, plus front and rear lights if the cyclist intends to bike at night. However, the Highway Code does advise consideration of pedestrians in this, and whilst calling out may be acceptable, a bell may be more socially considerate.

Lane Splitting

Lane splitting, when cyclists undertake and overtake cars and change lanes in order to move through traffic faster, is perfectly legal.

The Highway Code states that road users should be aware of others when travelling. It also mentions cyclists should avoid filtering in and out of traffic if it could cause conflict with another person. An example of this is when approaching a junction. Overtaking is the safest way to do this, as it is generally less dangerous than undertaking.

Speed Limits

Unlike vehicles, there is no speed limit for cyclists on the roads. However, some local authorities do impose speed limits for cyclists. They must also follow a speed limit in the Royal parks.

Although speeding is not an offence in itself, cyclists who cycle dangerously are committing an offence under section 28 of the Road Traffic Act 1988. This means that they can face fines of up to £2500. Careless cycling is also an offence under section 29 of the Road Traffic Act 1988. This is when a cyclist uses the road without due care and attention for other road users. A cyclist doing this may face a fine of up to £1000.

The Most Common Causes of Cycling Accidents

Accidents involving cyclists can happen for all sorts of reasons. However, in our experience, the most common causes of cycling accident claims include:

  • Hit and run road traffic accidents.
  • Collision with a car, vehicle or even another cyclist or a pedestrian.
  • Vehicle doors opening into the path of an oncoming cyclist.
  • Potholes, worn tarmac, raised manhole covers and other defects in the road.
  • Any slippery road conditions due to oil spills, ice and snow.

Many cyclists don’t realise that if an accident was someone else’s fault, a cyclist can claim compensation.

Who Is at Fault for Cycling Accidents?

There are instances in cycling accidents where the cyclist may be at fault, and there are instances where it may be someone else’s fault. instances where a cyclist may be at fault include not wearing high visibility clothing, not having lights on their bike, cycling whilst under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or cycling carelessly. If a cyclist has not followed the rules set out in The Highway Code, then they may also be at fault.

Cyclists Rights on Roads: How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience in all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accidents on the road involving cyclists. Contact us today by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Most Common Accidents at Work: Retail

The retail industry is one of the major industries in the UK, employing around 3 million people. As with any industry, retail accidents are a risk factor that many employees face. However, if their employer is not taking care to do all they can to stop accidents at work, then they may be at fault if an employee has an accident.

Causes of Retail Accidents

There are two main causes of retail accidents at work. These are: slips, trips and falls and manual handling.

Slips trips and falls are the most common cause of any accident at work. According to the Health and Safety Executive, these accidents account for around 40% of all reported accidents in the retail industry. They can happen because of spillages, wet floors, uneven flooring, equipment or stock on the floor, damaged flooring, and much more.

There are a number of health and safety guidelines that your employer must follow to stop accidents like this happening.

Manual handling accidents often happen due to inaccurate or inadequate training. If someone does not have the proper training to lift stock or deliveries and they injure themselves whilst doing so, then their employer may be responsible. There are health and safety rules which employers must follow to minimise the risk of these accidents happening.

Your Employer’s Responsibility

Employers must make sure that they do everything in their power to make sure their employees do not have any accidents whilst working. There are health and safety guidelines that they must follow to do this. These guidelines include the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 and the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Employers must also ensure that they carry out regular risk assessments. These risk assessments cover both working practice and working environment. For example, risk assessments must be carried out on any carpeted areas at work to ensure that they are not damaged and safe to walk on. They must also carry out risk assessments for how the employees work, such as lifting and handling assessments. This ensures that employees are trained safely on how to do their jobs.

If employers fail to carry out these risk assessments and an employee has an accident, then they may be to blame for the accident.

Claiming Against Your Employer

When you make a claim against your employer for an accident at work, the claim comes from an insurance policy. This is known as Employer’s Liability Insurance. All employers in the United Kingdom must have this insurance. It protects them when accidents happen, as the compensation comes from the insurance. Therefore, it is the insurance company that pays the compensation; it does not come directly out of your employer’s pocket.

How We Can Help with Retail Accidents

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes retail accidents at work. Contact us by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Most Common Accidents at Work: Warehousing

There are many different industries where accidents at work can happen. In fact, accidents can happen in any workplace. However, there are some industries where accidents at work are more common. One of these industries is warehousing. Statistics show that warehousing accidents are amongst the most common accidents at work.

Warehousing Accidents

Warehousing accidents are very common. In the warehousing industry, there were over 23,000 injuries at work in 2019/20 according to the Health and Safety Executive. There are some injuries that are more common than others, with lifting and handling accidents being the most common. These injuries accommodated for 19% of injuries to workers in warehouses in 2019/20.

Lifting and Handling

Lifting and handling accounted for the most accidents to warehouse staff. When you are lifting and handling at work, your manager must make sure that they are following the manual handling safety rules. This is to minimise the risks of accidents at work, and keep employees safe. One of the biggest aspects of the manual handling regulations is carrying out risk assessments.

Hit by Moving Vehicle/ Falling Objects

The other two main areas of accident at work that are common in the warehouse industry are being hit by a moving vehicle, and being hit by falling objects. These accidents happen a lot due to reckless driving and lack of training on forklift trucks. Only people who have had the correct training should use forklift trucks. Accidents that involve falling objects usually happen because of poor stacking and loading of items.

Your Employers Responsibility

It is your employer’s responsibility to ensure you are safe at work. This means that they must follow correct health and safety guidelines to minimise the risk of accidents and to keep all their employees safe. They must carry out adequate and frequent risk assessments on the machinery and equipment, and make sure that staff training is always up to date.

If you are a temporary or agency worker, your employer has as much of a duty to protect you as a full time, permanent employee. This means they must also ensure that your training is adequate and correct before you do the job. They must also ensure they maintain this training.

If your employer does not follow the correct health and safety guidelines, such as the Manual Handling Regulations and the Health and Safety at work regulations, and you have an accident whilst at work, then you may be able to make a claim. All employers must have Employer’s Liability insurance. This covers the business in case accidents at work happen. If you have had an accident and make a claim, then it is the insurance that pays the compensation.

How We Can Help with Warehousing Accidents

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with personal injury claims. This includes accidents at work. Contact us by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisor.

Public Accidents Whilst Dog Walking

All dog owners know that there is nothing better than taking your dog for a walk. When you are doing this, it is not always easy to notice if there is anything wrong with the area you are walking in. This is particularly true on pavements. However, public accidents whilst dog walking can be common. If you have an accident on the pavement due to a defect in the pavement, or if you have had an accident in a park whilst out walking your dog, then it may be someone else’s fault.

Accidents on Pavements

If you trip on a pavement whilst walking your dog, then the local council may be responsible. If there is a pothole in the pavement, or paving stones that are damaged, then the council may be to blame for your accident.

Your local authority has the responsibility to take all reasonable steps to make council property safe. These features include council buildings like schools and parks, council-owned homes, roads, pavements, and street lighting. So if you have fallen whilst walking your dog, and it is due to a defective pavement, for example, then we maybe able to help.

The council must also make sure they are carrying out regular maintenance and safety checks on roads and pavements to ensure people do not have accidents.

There is a rule with pavement trips, and that is that the defect must be an inch or bigger. That includes potholes that are an inch deep, broken paving stones or curbs that are raised by an inch.

Accidents in Parks

Much like accidents on pavements, the council is also responsible for ensuring parks are safe and free from accidents. However, if you have had an accident in a park, it may be harder to hold the council to account. If you have had an accident on a public footpath in a park because of a defect, you may be able to make a claim. but that is not to say that if you had an accident elsewhere in a park then it is not the fault of the council. The best way to find out is by contacting The Compensation Experts. We may still be able to help depending on the circumstances of your accident.

What to do when you have had an accident

It is important to take pictures of what you have fallen on, so that there is proof of the defect for your claim. It is also important to report your accident to the council, so that they are aware of the defect. Sometimes it can also be helpful to know how long the defect has been there, and if there have ever been any accidents there before because of the defect.

These accidents can also cause injuries that can take a while to heal, meaning you may not be able to walk your dog or partake in other hobbies for a while. It is important to note this down, as it may affect your potential compensation amount.

How we can help

Here at The Compensation Experts, we work with solicitors who have years of experience in dealing with personal injury claims. This includes public accidents whilst dog walking. Contact us today by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Most Common Accidents at Work: Construction

When it comes to accidents at work, there are many hazards that you may face. You may slip or trip on something or you may have an accident due to faulty equipment. There are some industries where the hazards at work can be more common. One of these is the construction industry.

Construction Accidents

In the construction industry in 2019-20 alone there were 81,000 workers who were suffering from work-related ill health, according to the Health and Safety Executive. There were some accidents that were more common than others. The most common accidents on construction sites include falls from height, manual handling accidents, slips trips and falls, and workers hit by moving vehicles and objects.

Falls from Height

Falls from height accounted for most of the accidents at work, with these accidents being around 47% of the total number of accidents in 2019-20. There are many causes of from height. These include scaffolding falls, ladder falls and weather conditions. Your employer must follow the rules set out in the Work at Height Regulations. This is to ensure you are safe at work.

Manual Handling Accidents

Manual handling accidents are another risk of working on a construction site. They often happen due to inadequate or incorrect training. It is your employer’s responsibility to keep you safe at work, and to make sure they follow the Manual Handling Regulations. They must also make sure that everyone has the proper training to avoid accidents. Manual handling accidents were around 19% of all the self-reported accidents at work in 2019-20.

Slips, Trips and Falls

Slips, trips and falls are also common on construction sites. They were around 26% of the accidents that were reported to RIDDOR in 2019-20. As construction sites tend to be busy workplaces, employers and employees must take extra care to avoid slips, trips and falls. This includes keeping communal areas clear, making sure work spaces are kept tidy, and keeping walkways clear. Your employer must make sure that these rules are enforced to keep everyone safe. They must also do this to minimise the risk of accidents.

Struck by Falling Objects/ Moving Vehicles

The final accident types that we have found are most common on construction sites are being hit by moving vehicles and objects. These accidents accounted for around 22% of all self-reported accidents in 2019-20. Your employer must make sure that everything on the construction site is safe. They must carry out risk assessments to ensure this. They must also ensure people who are operating vehicles are properly trained, and must ensure that all objects are stored safely to ensure they do not fall. Finally, they must also make sure all employees are wearing the correct safety equipment.

How We Can Help with Construction Accidents

Here at The Compensation Experts, the solicitors we work with have years of experience in dealing with accidents at work. This includes construction site accidents. Contact us by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly, knowledgeable advisors.

Reporting Your Accident

No matter the type of accident you have, reporting your accident is important. It is important for a number of reasons, including for proof of your accident happening. Other reasons include: so the other party knows the accident happened, loss of earnings due to taking time off work, medical reasons, and to ensure it does not happen again.

According to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) more than 14,000 people die as a result of accidents every year, with thousands more having injuries.

Reporting Your Accident at Work

If you have an accident at work, it is important to report the accident to your employer. In workplaces where there is an accident book, you must make sure you log the accident in there. If not, you must report the accident verbally to a manager or supervisor.

When reporting your accident at work, it is important to note down the date and time of the accident, the cause of the accident, whether there were any witnesses, the treatment you had, and the amount of time you had to take off work.

Reporting Your Accident in a Public Place

Having an accident in a public place may mean that there are a few people that you need to think about when reporting your accident. If you fell in a shop, you need to report your accident to the shop owner or manager. Most shops will also have an accident book or form, so it is important to fill that in too.

If you have an accident on the street, for example, a trip on the pavement, then you will need to report your accident to the council. However, if the council have sent you a claims form, it is important that you do not fill that in and send back if you would like to make a personal injury claim. Nevertheless, the council does need to know about any defects in pavements or roads, so it is still important to report your accident.

Reporting Your Accident on the Road

If you have an accident on the road, for example, a road traffic accident, there are a couple of people you may need to think about reporting your accident to. You must report the accident to your insurance, and take the details of the other person involved in the accident. This is usually their name, registration number and insurance details.

You may also need to report your accident to the police. This is almost always the case in road traffic accidents, as the police are usually called to the scene. If they are not, it is still important to report your accident to them.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts, we work with solicitors who have years of experience in dealing with all types of personal injury claims. This includes accidents at work, accidents in public places, and accidents on the road. Contact us today by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.