31-year-old man unable to talk or walk after fall from height at work

A 31-year-old army veteran from Lancashire has had a serious injury following a fall from height at work, being unable to walk or talk, and only able to move his eyebrows.

The man, who is a roofer by trade, was attending his day job as usual in March when he fell from the top of a ladder in Burnley. Paramedics had to place him into an induced coma at the side of the road before he was airlifted to Royal Preston Hospital, where he had to undergo emergency brain surgery within hours of arrival, and further surgery 48 hours later.

He is now bed-bound after suffering a broken back, severe head trauma and a popped lung following the accident. His injuries have left him unable to move or speak, with the 31-year-old only able to move his eyebrows by means of communication.

Fall from height at work

Falls from Height at Work

There are many industries where you may need to work at height, which comes with the risk of falls from height at work. One of the industries is construction, including roofing, which the Lancashire man worked in. The further you are working from the ground, the more dangerous your working conditions are. Your employers have a duty to make sure you are less at risk. If you work in one of these industries, then it is the responsibility of your employer to make sure that you are kept safe. They must follow the Work at Height Regulations 2005.

Falls from height account for most accidents at work, with these accidents being around 47% of the total number of accidents in 2019-20.

Responsibility of Employers

To ensure everyone is safe at work, there are certain regulations that employers must follow. These include The Health and Safety Act and the Work at Height Regulations. These regulations are designed to keep employees safe at work, and to minimise the risk of accidents happening. There are processes that employers must follow to keep employees safe at work. In the case of the roofer who had a fall from height at work, the rules for working at height must be strictly followed. These rules include:

  • Making sure equipment is safe to use
  • Maintaining equipment
  • Following health and safety rules
  • Performing risk assessments

If your employer has not followed the guidelines to keep you safe at work, or has done so incorrectly, you may be able to claim compensation. We understand that you may feel uneasy about claiming against your employer, however all employers must have employer’s liability insurance. This covers the costs of accidents at work, including accidents falling from height. It is the insurance which would pay the compensation, so your employer would not be directly out of pocket.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes falls from height at work. Contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Accidents at Work: UK at risk of falling behind EU in worker’s rights

According to a recent report by the BBC, the UK is at risk of falling behind the EU when it comes to worker’s rights. The investigation was conducted by the Trade Union Congress (TUC). The union body said the EU had “various initiatives” in the pipeline which would improve standards once they became law. But it said the UK had no similar legislation on the way. This investigation by the TUC, if correct, could have an impact on accidents at work. If you have an accident at work and it is the fault of your employer because they fail to follow procedures, then you may be able to make a claim.

Common workplace hazards can put you at risk, and take you away from the job.

How this can affect accidents at work

If the report by the TUC is correct, then it may not be only worker’s rights that are impacted by companies falling behind. If a company is not adhering to its basic worker’s rights, then they may also not be taking all the steps they can to avoid employees having accidents at work.

The nature of an employee’s work environment may mean they are more likely to have an accident at work, such as jobs in warehouses, building sites and factories. However, this does not mean you can’t suffer an injury in an office environment. But, compared to employees in the construction industry for instance, injuries at work are more prevalent due to its elevated risk whilst working.

Your employer must ensure that you’re working in a safe environment in order to avoid workplace injuries, even if you work in an office. Here are some common workplace injuries that would be a genuine reason   to make an accident at work claim:

  • Electric Shock
  • Eye Injury
  • Head/brain Injuries
  • Fractured/broken bones or dislocated joints
  • Muscle Strains 
  • Slips & Trips – loose carpet, wet floors etc.
  • Falls
  • Exposure to Dangerous Substances
  • Chemical Burns
  • Hearing Damage
  • Falling Object
  • Collisions

Your Employer’s Responsibility

When you are at work, it is your employer’s responsibility to keep you safe. They must adhere to many regulations to ensure they are doing everything they can to avoid accidents and injuries to their employees. These regulations include the Health and Safety Act. it is important that your employer follows these regulations as, not only does it keep you safe, it also ensures that they do not get reprimanded by the Health and Safety Executive.

If employers in the UK are falling behind in their treatment of worker’s rights as the TUC claim, then they are putting their employees at risk of having accidents at work, either through overworking them or not ensuring they are in a safe workspace.

How we can help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accident at work claims. If you have had an accident at work that was due to your employer neglecting their responsibilities, contact us by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Plant hire company fined following fatal incident

A specialist plant hire company has been fined after a worker was fatally injured, according to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The worker was undertaking maintenance on a piling rig when the accident happened.

In 2014, Ben Wylie was assisting the Ruislip Plant Ltd Director Mr Noel Kearney with the maintenance of a high-pressure grease track adjusting mechanism at a construction site in Maidenhead. During the process, someone forcibly ejected the grease nipple assembly and a stream of high-pressure grease from the mechanism. This struck Ben Wylie in the shoulder and chest causing fatal injuries.

The Health and Safety Executive investigated the incident. The investigation found that the components were forcibly ejected the day before and were damaged. Once they ejected the fitting, it should not have been refitted. Despite this, Mr Kearney attempted to modify and refit the grease nipple and adaptor to the high-pressure system. He then began to re-pressurise the tracks by pumping in grease using a hand operated grease gun. The pressure built in the system and at a critical point they then ejected the components. The plant should have done a pressure test with all suitable safeguards in these circumstances. However there was no safe system of work during this. It resulted in the modifications to the grease gun bringing Ben Wylie into the danger zone.

Ruislip Plant Ltd pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. The plant hire company was fined £99,000 and had to pay costs of £116, 973.36.

Your Employer’s Responsibility in Accidents at Work

Your employer is responsible for keeping you safe at work. They must make sure that they meet the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999). The way they do this is by conducting risk assessments to ensure that everyone is kept safe. Employers must make sure that they do everything possible to avoid staff having accidents whilst at work.

If you are self-employed, you may still be able to claim. A lot of on-site workers often work on a contractor basis. This means that there is still a company that they are working for. If the business fails in their duty to keep you safe, then they may be responsible for your accident.

The Health and Safety Executive said the following about the accident. “This incident could have been avoided if Ruislip Plant Ltd had undertaken a risk assessment and devised a safe system of work.

“That failure to adhere to the correct procedure for pressure testing was directly causative of this incident. Ruislip Plant Limited put no control measures in place by Ruislip Plant Limited and that sadly led to the death of Ben Wylie.”

Plant Hire Company Fined: How We Can Help with Accidents at Work

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accidents at work. Contact us by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

The Workplace Safety Index

The rate of accident and injury in the workplace is gradually slowing down YoY, yet there are still areas of great concern for businesses moving forward. Notably, we can reveal that an astonishing 37% of workers have had an accident at work, likely contributed to by one-in-ten Brits never being given safety training. All factors considered, the average UK employee rates their workplace just 7.5/10 for safety. 

Naturally, there are also incidents that go unaddressed, and only a third (34%) of Brits feel comfortable filing an accident report. Subsequently, nearly a quarter (23%) are hesitant to file a report for fear of taking time off work, 22% worry about getting in trouble, and one-in-five are anxious about completing paperwork.  

In terms of COVID era concerns, just 37% of Brits believe their employer takes social distancing seriously and 39% have felt unsafe at work during the pandemic. Meanwhile, only half (52%) of UK employees have been distributed sufficient workplace personal protective equipment (PPE) to combat the pandemic.  

But how do workers from each British industry and sector stand on the matter of safety? 

Agriculture  

With a safety score of just 6.6 out of 10, Brits consider agriculture to be the most dangerous industry. Supporting this notion, well over half (59%) of the sector’s employee base has experienced accident or injury while on the farm. Workplace machinery is the largest concern for farmers fearing a farm accident, given a safety score of just 5.4, while stability of flooring and building conditions score 6 and 6.4, respectively.  

Astonishingly, despite outside working being par for the course, just over one-in-ten (15%) agriculture workers feel social distancing has been taken seriously during the ongoing pandemic, while PPE distribution scored just 6.6. 

Healthcare 

Despite being more impacted than most during the pandemic, healthcare professionals don’t believe their industry (7.9) has distributed PPE as well as hospitality workers (8.1) do theirs. Addressing another COVID concern, over half (53%) of hospital staff believe social distancing has been all but ignored.

In terms of practical danger, intricate medical machinery (7.5) ranks among the safest of UK workplace equipment, while the standard of flooring (7.8) and infrastructure (8) is also high performing. Incredibly, despite ranking reasonably for overall safety (7.5), a third (34%) of healthcare workers have experienced an accident or injury on the job.  

Hospitality  

The staggering statistic to come out of the hospitality industry is just how many workers (42%) have injured themselves while performing their role, despite the industry being perceived to be among the safest (7.6). Similarly, the overall condition of machinery (7.7), flooring (8), and infrastructure (8.2) is also thought of as relatively safe. 

Despite the efficient distribution of PPE (8.1), hospitality workers are a little hung up on how seriously their employers have taken social distancing, with 61% believing more could be done to tackle COVID. 

Office work 

There’s no safer place to work than the office, according to our research, as just 16% of nine-to-fivers have experienced an accident at their desk. Similarly, the office is perceived to be one of the least dangerous places to work (7.6), bettered only by the classroom (7.8). 

Focussing on the environment’s specifics, no other workplace features safer equipment (7.7), while overall flooring (8) and infrastructure (8.2) are also among the UK’s best-in-class. Meanwhile, however, office workers are well within their rights to have COVID concerns, with PPE distribution (7.5) far from the standard set by hospitality, and over half of staff (54%) believing management should take social distance rules more seriously.  

Public service 

Despite a third (36%) of public servants suffering an accident at work at some point in their career, the industry has a slightly above-average perceived safety value (7.4). Addressing the day-to-day, equipment and relevant machinery (7.4) ranks similarly, while the perception of flooring (7.8) and infrastructure (7.6) follows a similar pattern. 

COVID-wise, public servants are a little concerned, with less than half (42%) of sector workers feeling their employer treats social distancing seriously. However, they can take some comfort in PPE distribution across the industry being ranked as reasonably efficient (7.7). 

Retail 

As far as retail workers are concerned, their job is among the least safe in the country (7.3), with just warehousing (7) and agriculture (6.6) worse off. And with 40% of the industry’s workforce having experienced an instance of injury at some point, there’s little room for argument.  

Importantly, equipment is considered far from safe (7), with, again, only warehouse (6.9) and agriculture machinery (5.4) ranked more dangerous. Meanwhile, though, the state of flooring (7.6) and infrastructure (7.7) each rank a little more impressively.  

Looking at the contemporary issue of COVID compliance, only a third (35%) of employees feel social distancing is taken seriously, while PPE distribution (7.5) has thus far been relatively underwhelming. 

Education  

Designed as an area of wellbeing for children of all ages, you’d expect nothing less than exceptional safety in the classroom (7.8), so it’s no surprise it tops our index as the most highly thought of workplace for safety. Classroom flooring (8) also tops the charts, joint with that of offices and restaurants. Meanwhile, equipment and apparatus scores slightly lower (7.4). Strikingly, however, a third (32%) of teachers have admitted to experiencing an accident or injury during their career. 

When it comes to COVID, the classroom has been hit as hard as any other workplace, but PPE distribution in schools (7.2) is among the worst of any sector. Similarly, 62% of teachers feel social distancing hasn’t been enforced sufficiently, although the practical application could be tricky given the energetic and lively nature of children. 

Transport and logistics 

Due to the vehicular nature of the job, it’s unsurprising that transport workers consider their day-to-day machinery among the least safe of all industries (7), behind only warehousing (6.9) and agriculture (5.4).  

Despite the overall condition of flooring (7.5) and infrastructure (7.8) perceived to be slightly better, the working environment (7.3) is perceived to be marginally more dangerous than the average industry, supported by an astonishing 46% of employees suffering injury on the job.  

In relation to COVID safety concerns, workers are generally satisfied with the distribution of PPE (7.8), although just 34% feel their boss or manager has taken social distancing seriously throughout the pandemic.  

Warehousing 

Warehousing is widely regarded as one of the more dangerous industries (7), with agriculture (6.6) the only sector considered less safe. Focussing on the practicalities of the job, warehouse machinery such as forklift trucks are far from fool proof (6.9), while flooring (7.3) and infrastructure (7.6) also rank among the least safe across all sectors.  

COVID-wise, things don’t improve, either; warehouse management is up there with the worst for enforcing social distancing, with just 34% of the employee base happy with their efforts, and PPE distribution (7.5) is simply average compared to most other industries.  

However, despite worker sentiment all pointing in one direction, the reality is that only 30% of staff have experienced an accident or injury at work, which ranks the warehouse as safer than all workplaces but the office. 

Compiling workplace data from real employees, we’ve managed to reveal which UK industries are the safest, and which are, indeed, the most dangerous for workplace accidents. For even more expert debate and advice around the subject of workplace safety, enjoy exploring the latest on our blog

Accidents at Work for Non-Permanent Staff

Accidents at work can be bad for anyone; having to take time off work when you can not afford it and worrying about work can be stressful. This can be made worse if you have had an accident at a workplace where you are not a permanent member of staff. However, your employer has the same amount of responsibility to an agency or temporary worker as they do to a permanent member of staff.

So if you have had an accident at work as a non-permanent staff member and it was someone else’s fault, then you may still be able to claim compensation.

If you have had an accident whilst working for an agency, temporary contract or sub-contract, you have the same right to claim as a permanent employee. Employers have a duty of care to everyone who is working for the company, including agency staff. Agency staff must have the adequate site induction when starting at a new company. Agency staff must also have the same level of training as a permanent employee would have, and the same risk assessments must also be carried out.

Accidents at Work for Non-Permanent Staff: Your Employer’s Responsibility

It is your employer’s responsibility to keep you safe at work. They must make sure you have the correct training and equipment to be able to do your job correctly. Risk assessments must also be carried out, to ensure the job is done safely. Your employer must follow the Health and Safety at work Regulations.

If your employer has not followed the guidelines to keep you safe at work, or has done so incorrectly, you may be able to claim compensation. We understand that you may feel uneasy about claiming against your employer, however all employers must have employer’s liability insurance. This covers the costs of accidents at work. It is the insurance which would pay the compensation, so your employer would not be directly out of pocket.

Risk Assessments

Industries where non-permanent staff members are common include construction sites, warehouses and production. All of these industries can be dangerous, and require risk assessments. Risk assessments are vital in ensuring that accidents do not happen. The employer is responsible for completing risk assessments. This makes sure that all employees who undertake the job do so safely.

During a risk assessment, your employer takes into consideration factors such as; training needs, the amount of people required to lift the object safely if it is manual handling, how many people are needed to do the job safely, the safety of the equipment being used (if any) and if there are any specific needs to the job, for example machinery or protective clothing.

How We Can Help with Accidents at Work for Non-Permanent Staff

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of accident at work claims. This includes claiming if you have had an accident as a non-permanent staff member. Contact us today by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

What Are Occupier’s Liability Accidents?

Any private premises in the UK has an owner; someone who is responsible for keeping people who visit the premises safe. Private premises can be anything from shops to car parks. Occupier’s liability is the area of law that deals with this duty of care and occupier’s liability accidents. It concerns anyone who owns a property that the public can visit.

The Difference Between Occupier’s Liability and Public Liability

Occupier’s liability refers to anyone who owns a property that the public can visit. Due to this, they are sometimes wrongly referred to as public liability accidents. However, the difference is in the owner of the place where the accident happened. Public liability generally covers places that the council own and are responsible for. Occupier’s liability covers places that are privately owned.

Occupier’s Liability Accidents

The types of accidents that generally come under occupier’s liability accidents include accidents in shops, supermarkets, car parks, restaurants, and private residences. Owners of properties must take steps to help ensure that people do not have accidents on their premises.

There are many causes of accidents that fall under occupier’s liability. Some of these include:

  • Slipping on wet surfaces
  • Tripping over uneven floors or obstacles left in walkways
  • Being struck by a falling object, such as an item falling from a shelf
  • Accidents in car parks due to poor layouts or bad lighting
  • Malfunctioning lifts and automatic doors

These causes of accidents are easy to avoid. The owner of the premises should ensure that they put measures in place to avoid accidents like this from happening. They must ensure they follow rules set out in the Occupiers Liability Act 1957 to minimise the risk of accidents happening. If they fail to do this then they may be liable if someone has an accident on their premises.

Children and Occupier’s Liability Accidents

Some of the more common occupier’s liability accidents involve children. If children are visiting a place that falls under occupier’s liability, then the owner must take extra care to minimise the risk of children having accidents. This is because children tend to be less careful than adults whilst out in public.

If your child has had an accident is a public or private place, then you may be able to claim on their behalf. If your child is under 18, then a parent or guardian may make a claim for them. Their parent or guardian also has until the child turns 18 to make a claim. If the child is over 18 then they have until they are 21 to make a claim themselves.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who deal with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accidents in private places. This means that they have the expertise to help you with your potential claim. Contact us today by filling in our contact form or by calling us on 0800 182 2185 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

What is the Difference Between Raynaud’s and Vibration White Finger?

Raynaud’s Phenomenon is a common condition that does not usually cause any problems. However, people often confuse it with Vibration White Finger. The difference between Raynaud’s and Vibration White Finger is that VWF is actually a secondary form of Raynaud’s syndrome that is caused by prolonged us of vibrating tools.

Vibration White Finger is also known as Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS). People have developed HAVS as a result of prolonged exposure to intense vibration tools over a long period of time.

The Difference Between Raynaud’s and Vibration White Finger

Vibration White Finger, also known as Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) is a secondary form of Raynaud’s Phenomenon. It usually affects those who work with, or have worked with, vibrating tools over a long period of time.

There are a few things that can cause confusion between the two conditions. The main reason people think that Raynaud’s and Vibration White Finger are the same condition is because of the two having similar symptoms.

The symptoms of Raynaud’s include:

  • Pain
  • Numbness
  • Pins and needles
  • Difficulty moving the affected area

The symptoms of Vibration White Finger include:

  • Whitening or blanching of the fingertips
  • Numbness and tingling in the fingers or hands
  • Cysts in finger and wrist bones
  • Lack of dexterity or grip strength
  • Loss of sensitivity of touch

The two conditions can also be worse in the cold. Vibration White Finger has the same symptoms as Raynaud’s with added ones on top of it.

Causes of Vibration White Finger

Vibration White Finger is caused by the use of vibrating tools over a long period of time. This can be a part of your job, but if you did not have the adequate protection whilst at work and you have Vibration White Finger, then you may be able to make a claim.

Some of the tools that can give off enough vibration to cause VWF include: jackhammers, grinders, breakers, jigsaws, and hand held power tools. This list is not exhaustive, ad any power tool has the potential to cause VWF.

As people who use power tools for a living will be particularly susceptible to VWF as they are using them on a daily basis for long periods of time, employers have a duty to inform employees of the risks associated with the work and to provide adequate safety equipment, such as vibration-absorbing gloves.

Other ways to help prevent VWF include:

  • Taking regular breaks from using vibrating tools
  • Ensuring tools have a regular maintenance schedule and are in good order
  • Undertaking training to ensure you are using tools in the correct way

What to do if you think you have Vibration White Finger

If you think you may have Vibration White Finger, the first thing you should do is make an appointment with your GP to get a diagnosis of the condition. The next thing you should do is make a note of the companies you worked for and how long you worked at each one, the tools you used and the average amount of time you used them per day. This information will help you if you wish to make a claim for VWF.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of industrial disease claims. This includes Vibration White Finger. Contact us today by filling in out contact form or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Most Common Accidents at Work: Retail

The retail industry is one of the major industries in the UK, employing around 3 million people. As with any industry, retail accidents are a risk factor that many employees face. However, if their employer is not taking care to do all they can to stop accidents at work, then they may be at fault if an employee has an accident.

Causes of Retail Accidents

There are two main causes of retail accidents at work. These are: slips, trips and falls and manual handling.

Slips trips and falls are the most common cause of any accident at work. According to the Health and Safety Executive, these accidents account for around 40% of all reported accidents in the retail industry. They can happen because of spillages, wet floors, uneven flooring, equipment or stock on the floor, damaged flooring, and much more.

There are a number of health and safety guidelines that your employer must follow to stop accidents like this happening.

Manual handling accidents often happen due to inaccurate or inadequate training. If someone does not have the proper training to lift stock or deliveries and they injure themselves whilst doing so, then their employer may be responsible. There are health and safety rules which employers must follow to minimise the risk of these accidents happening.

Your Employer’s Responsibility

Employers must make sure that they do everything in their power to make sure their employees do not have any accidents whilst working. There are health and safety guidelines that they must follow to do this. These guidelines include the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 and the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

Employers must also ensure that they carry out regular risk assessments. These risk assessments cover both working practice and working environment. For example, risk assessments must be carried out on any carpeted areas at work to ensure that they are not damaged and safe to walk on. They must also carry out risk assessments for how the employees work, such as lifting and handling assessments. This ensures that employees are trained safely on how to do their jobs.

If employers fail to carry out these risk assessments and an employee has an accident, then they may be to blame for the accident.

Claiming Against Your Employer

When you make a claim against your employer for an accident at work, the claim comes from an insurance policy. This is known as Employer’s Liability Insurance. All employers in the United Kingdom must have this insurance. It protects them when accidents happen, as the compensation comes from the insurance. Therefore, it is the insurance company that pays the compensation; it does not come directly out of your employer’s pocket.

How We Can Help with Retail Accidents

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes retail accidents at work. Contact us by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Most Common Accidents at Work: Warehousing

There are many different industries where accidents at work can happen. In fact, accidents can happen in any workplace. However, there are some industries where accidents at work are more common. One of these industries is warehousing. Statistics show that warehousing accidents are amongst the most common accidents at work.

Warehousing Accidents

Warehousing accidents are very common. In the warehousing industry, there were over 23,000 injuries at work in 2019/20 according to the Health and Safety Executive. There are some injuries that are more common than others, with lifting and handling accidents being the most common. These injuries accommodated for 19% of injuries to workers in warehouses in 2019/20.

Lifting and Handling

Lifting and handling accounted for the most accidents to warehouse staff. When you are lifting and handling at work, your manager must make sure that they are following the manual handling safety rules. This is to minimise the risks of accidents at work, and keep employees safe. One of the biggest aspects of the manual handling regulations is carrying out risk assessments.

Hit by Moving Vehicle/ Falling Objects

The other two main areas of accident at work that are common in the warehouse industry are being hit by a moving vehicle, and being hit by falling objects. These accidents happen a lot due to reckless driving and lack of training on forklift trucks. Only people who have had the correct training should use forklift trucks. Accidents that involve falling objects usually happen because of poor stacking and loading of items.

Your Employers Responsibility

It is your employer’s responsibility to ensure you are safe at work. This means that they must follow correct health and safety guidelines to minimise the risk of accidents and to keep all their employees safe. They must carry out adequate and frequent risk assessments on the machinery and equipment, and make sure that staff training is always up to date.

If you are a temporary or agency worker, your employer has as much of a duty to protect you as a full time, permanent employee. This means they must also ensure that your training is adequate and correct before you do the job. They must also ensure they maintain this training.

If your employer does not follow the correct health and safety guidelines, such as the Manual Handling Regulations and the Health and Safety at work regulations, and you have an accident whilst at work, then you may be able to make a claim. All employers must have Employer’s Liability insurance. This covers the business in case accidents at work happen. If you have had an accident and make a claim, then it is the insurance that pays the compensation.

How We Can Help with Warehousing Accidents

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with personal injury claims. This includes accidents at work. Contact us by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisor.

Most Common Accidents at Work: Construction

When it comes to accidents at work, there are many hazards that you may face. You may slip or trip on something or you may have an accident due to faulty equipment. There are some industries where the hazards at work can be more common. One of these is the construction industry.

Construction Accidents

In the construction industry in 2019-20 alone there were 81,000 workers who were suffering from work-related ill health, according to the Health and Safety Executive. There were some accidents that were more common than others. The most common accidents on construction sites include falls from height, manual handling accidents, slips trips and falls, and workers hit by moving vehicles and objects.

Falls from Height

Falls from height accounted for most of the accidents at work, with these accidents being around 47% of the total number of accidents in 2019-20. There are many causes of from height. These include scaffolding falls, ladder falls and weather conditions. Your employer must follow the rules set out in the Work at Height Regulations. This is to ensure you are safe at work.

Manual Handling Accidents

Manual handling accidents are another risk of working on a construction site. They often happen due to inadequate or incorrect training. It is your employer’s responsibility to keep you safe at work, and to make sure they follow the Manual Handling Regulations. They must also make sure that everyone has the proper training to avoid accidents. Manual handling accidents were around 19% of all the self-reported accidents at work in 2019-20.

Slips, Trips and Falls

Slips, trips and falls are also common on construction sites. They were around 26% of the accidents that were reported to RIDDOR in 2019-20. As construction sites tend to be busy workplaces, employers and employees must take extra care to avoid slips, trips and falls. This includes keeping communal areas clear, making sure work spaces are kept tidy, and keeping walkways clear. Your employer must make sure that these rules are enforced to keep everyone safe. They must also do this to minimise the risk of accidents.

Struck by Falling Objects/ Moving Vehicles

The final accident types that we have found are most common on construction sites are being hit by moving vehicles and objects. These accidents accounted for around 22% of all self-reported accidents in 2019-20. Your employer must make sure that everything on the construction site is safe. They must carry out risk assessments to ensure this. They must also ensure people who are operating vehicles are properly trained, and must ensure that all objects are stored safely to ensure they do not fall. Finally, they must also make sure all employees are wearing the correct safety equipment.

How We Can Help with Construction Accidents

Here at The Compensation Experts, the solicitors we work with have years of experience in dealing with accidents at work. This includes construction site accidents. Contact us by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 0800 182 2187 to speak to one of our friendly, knowledgeable advisors.

Reporting Your Accident

No matter the type of accident you have, reporting your accident is important. It is important for a number of reasons, including for proof of your accident happening. Other reasons include: so the other party knows the accident happened, loss of earnings due to taking time off work, medical reasons, and to ensure it does not happen again.

According to the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) more than 14,000 people die as a result of accidents every year, with thousands more having injuries.

Reporting Your Accident at Work

If you have an accident at work, it is important to report the accident to your employer. In workplaces where there is an accident book, you must make sure you log the accident in there. If not, you must report the accident verbally to a manager or supervisor.

When reporting your accident at work, it is important to note down the date and time of the accident, the cause of the accident, whether there were any witnesses, the treatment you had, and the amount of time you had to take off work.

Reporting Your Accident in a Public Place

Having an accident in a public place may mean that there are a few people that you need to think about when reporting your accident. If you fell in a shop, you need to report your accident to the shop owner or manager. Most shops will also have an accident book or form, so it is important to fill that in too.

If you have an accident on the street, for example, a trip on the pavement, then you will need to report your accident to the council. However, if the council have sent you a claims form, it is important that you do not fill that in and send back if you would like to make a personal injury claim. Nevertheless, the council does need to know about any defects in pavements or roads, so it is still important to report your accident.

Reporting Your Accident on the Road

If you have an accident on the road, for example, a road traffic accident, there are a couple of people you may need to think about reporting your accident to. You must report the accident to your insurance, and take the details of the other person involved in the accident. This is usually their name, registration number and insurance details.

You may also need to report your accident to the police. This is almost always the case in road traffic accidents, as the police are usually called to the scene. If they are not, it is still important to report your accident to them.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts, we work with solicitors who have years of experience in dealing with all types of personal injury claims. This includes accidents at work, accidents in public places, and accidents on the road. Contact us today by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Delivery Drivers Work Accidents

The festive season is no doubt the busiest time of year for delivery drivers, and this year they are busier than ever. With everyone staying at home, and online shopping increasing, the extra work may mean that delivery drivers have more work accidents.

The Christmas rush means that there will be more delivery drivers on roads. There are many work accidents that delivery drivers can face, from road traffic accidents to manual handling accidents, and even accidents on customer’s property.

Manual Handling Accidents

One of the biggest causes of work accidents to delivery drivers is manual handling accidents. They often happen due to inadequate or incorrect training. They could also happen due to vans being overloaded.

Employers must ensure that all their staff have the correct training to do manual handling work. If you have had inadequate or incorrect training, your employer may be at fault for your accident. The most common injuries from manual handling accidents are back injuries, according to the Health and Safety Executive.

Your employer must follow the rules set out in the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992. This reduces the chances of accidents happening and is designed to protect staff.

Road Traffic Accidents

Having a road traffic accident at any time is bad but having one whilst you are working is even worse. The main cause of road traffic accidents is careless driving. If you have a road traffic accident whilst at work, you must make sure you report the accident to your employer as well as getting the details of the other driver and, if necessary, contacting the police.

Work Accidents whilst delivering

Another work accident that a delivery driver may have is an accident on the property where they are delivering. This could be a slip, trip or fall, a manual handling accident, or even a dog bite. There are various people who may be at fault if you have an accident on the property of the place you are delivering to.

If it is a business, then it is the business owner who may be at fault. This is especially true if you tripped on uneven paving. In this case, the blame could also fall with the local council, so it is important to take pictures of the defect.

If you are injured at someone’s house, and the person you are making the delivery to owns their property, it is the homeowner who may be at fault. There are certain specifics depending on the accident if it may be the homeowner who is at fault. These include insurance and ability to pay.

It is always important to report the accident to your employer. This is also true if you had the accident whilst you were out doing your deliveries.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts, we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with personal injury claims. This includes accidents at work. So contact us today by filling in our contact form, or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly, knowledgeable advisors.