Children’s Cycling Accidents: Risk may Increase in Warmer Weather

Now that the weather is improving, it is natural that children and adults alike may want to get out cycling. However, with more people around comes the heightened risk of children’s cycling accidents. There are some incidents where there may be an accident involving children where it is just that, an accident. However, if your child has had an accident where someone is to blame, then you may be able to claim compensation on their behalf.

Common Causes of Children’s Cycling Accidents

Many children have cycling accidents due to a variety of reasons. Some of these include:

  • Hit and run accidents
  • Cycling accidents in public areas such as skateparks and parks
  • Accidents due to defects in playgrounds and pavements
  • Slippery road or pavement conditions
  • Collisions with other cyclists or pedestrians

If your child has had a cycling accident due to one of these reasons, then it may be someone else’s fault and you may be able to make a claim on their behalf.

Children's cycling accidents

Minimising Risks of Children’s Cycling Accidents

The nature of children means that they may have accidents that there is no one to blame for. There are certain ways that you can minimise your child’s risk of having an accident by taking certain precautions. Here are a few tips from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) on how you can maximise the enjoyment and minimise the risk:

  • Carry out a regular safety check (tyres at the correct pressure, brakes working and nothing loose like spokes, saddle or handlebars)
  • Wearing a cycle helmet will help provide protection to the head in the event of a collision or falling off (remember to replace if damaged)
  • Make sure your child is not wearing any loose clothing or shoelaces, which could become tangled in the chain or wheels
  • Parents should ride with children to their competence and ability. Get them to demonstrate that they can safely control their bike and deal with other traffic
  • For older children, if they are riding away from home plan the route with them; use cycle tracks and avoid busy roads and junctions if possible.

Claiming on Behalf of a Child

If a child is injured in an accident, then a parent or guardian may be able to make a claim on their behalf. The time limits are also different when making a claim on behalf of a child. Ordinarily a person would have three years from the date of the accident to make a claim. This is different when claiming for a child.

In the case of a child’s accident, you have until they turn 18 to make a claim on their behalf. They then have three years from the date they turn 18 to make a claim. So, in theory, you may have a longer time in which to make a claim. however, it is always better to start a potential claim as soon as possible.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts, we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes children’s cycling accidents. Contact us by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

31-year-old man unable to talk or walk after fall from height at work

A 31-year-old army veteran from Lancashire has had a serious injury following a fall from height at work, being unable to walk or talk, and only able to move his eyebrows.

The man, who is a roofer by trade, was attending his day job as usual in March when he fell from the top of a ladder in Burnley. Paramedics had to place him into an induced coma at the side of the road before he was airlifted to Royal Preston Hospital, where he had to undergo emergency brain surgery within hours of arrival, and further surgery 48 hours later.

He is now bed-bound after suffering a broken back, severe head trauma and a popped lung following the accident. His injuries have left him unable to move or speak, with the 31-year-old only able to move his eyebrows by means of communication.

Fall from height at work

Falls from Height at Work

There are many industries where you may need to work at height, which comes with the risk of falls from height at work. One of the industries is construction, including roofing, which the Lancashire man worked in. The further you are working from the ground, the more dangerous your working conditions are. Your employers have a duty to make sure you are less at risk. If you work in one of these industries, then it is the responsibility of your employer to make sure that you are kept safe. They must follow the Work at Height Regulations 2005.

Falls from height account for most accidents at work, with these accidents being around 47% of the total number of accidents in 2019-20.

Responsibility of Employers

To ensure everyone is safe at work, there are certain regulations that employers must follow. These include The Health and Safety Act and the Work at Height Regulations. These regulations are designed to keep employees safe at work, and to minimise the risk of accidents happening. There are processes that employers must follow to keep employees safe at work. In the case of the roofer who had a fall from height at work, the rules for working at height must be strictly followed. These rules include:

  • Making sure equipment is safe to use
  • Maintaining equipment
  • Following health and safety rules
  • Performing risk assessments

If your employer has not followed the guidelines to keep you safe at work, or has done so incorrectly, you may be able to claim compensation. We understand that you may feel uneasy about claiming against your employer, however all employers must have employer’s liability insurance. This covers the costs of accidents at work, including accidents falling from height. It is the insurance which would pay the compensation, so your employer would not be directly out of pocket.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes falls from height at work. Contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Launch of campaign to reduce motorcycle collisions

Dorset police and Dorset Road Safe Partnership are working together, along with DocBike, to try and reduce motorcycle collisions this Spring. This comes after reports show that, in Dorset, per mile travelled, more motorcyclists die or are critically injured than any other road user. Nationally, approximately 10 motorcyclists are killed or seriously injured every day.

 In an effort to prevent road deaths across the county, the scheme is encouraging all road users to take that extra bit of time, particularly at junctions, and THINK BIKE! The campaign which is called ‘Think Bike, Have You Been Seen’, runs from 1st April until 31st October 2021. It will see unique road signs in key locations where many motorcyclists have had accidents in Dorset to date. 

An Inspector from Dorset Police stated: “Every year motorcycle fatalities peak throughout the spring and summer time. This is likely due to the better weather encouraging riders to travel more readily on two wheels.  The causes of collisions are a mixture of rider error and drivers not looking properly.”

Motorcycle Collisions

Nearly three-quarters of all motorcycle accidents involve a car, van, or lorry. In motorcycle accidents the lack of vehicle protection leaves riders incredibly vulnerable to catastrophic injury. Even the most responsible rider may have an accident which was not their fault.

The biggest reason behind compensation claims for motorbike accidents, accounting for nearly two-thirds, is the driver of the other vehicle ignoring the motorcyclist’s right of way either because they have not seen the motorcycle until it is too late, or because they are unaware of the laws about motorcyclists rights on the roads.

Some of the most common examples of motorcycle injury claims are:

  • Fractures
  • Whiplash
  • Head and spinal injuries
  • Fatalities

Road Traffic Accident or Motor Insurance Bureau Claim?

If you have an accident whilst on a motorcycle and you did not get the details of the driver, you may still be able to make a claim from the Motor Insurers Bureau. The Motor Insurers Bureau is an organisation that insurance companies pay into in the event of an accident with an uninsured or untraced driver. This would be the case if the driver drove away or they were uninsured. You must report your accident to the police at the time of the accident, or soon afterwards. The Motor Insurance Bureau will then pay the compensation rather than the insurance company.

How we can help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with personal injury claims. This includes road traffic accidents involving motorcycles. Contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Home accidents: The UK’s hidden household dangers

From hot hobs and sharp counter edges to electrical sockets and loose wires, your house is full of potential dangers for children. In fact, according to a new report by The Compensation Experts, an astonishing 67,135 children were admitted to hospital in 2020 due to injuries sustained at home.

Reading on, we reveal the safety features UK parents most commonly neglect, the most dangerous rooms in the house for children, and our top tips for keeping kids safe.

Uncovering the most common household accidents

Children are inquisitive, crafty, and playful, so it’s only natural that they find themselves in risky situations, especially when left to their own devices. To avoid catastrophe, it’s important to put basic protective measures in place to prevent your children from hurting themselves. However, after questioning 1,000 UK parents about their protective habits, it’s clear that not all mums and dads get around to installing the appropriate equipment.

For example, as many as half of parents have never positioned a safeguard over a hot hob to protect little one from burning their fingers, while over four-in-ten (42%) have never installed corner guards. Unfortunately, these measures should, perhaps, be treated with a little more gravitas, as, in 2020, a reported 16% of children suffered serious burns and 27% experienced bumped heads off table edges.

Staggeringly, a further 41% of parents claim to have disregarded the danger of open cupboards and drawers, which led to 13% of children consuming a dangerous detergent pod in 2020. Similarly, 40% of UK parents actively ignore notoriously hazardous plug sockets, even though 13% of children injure themselves annually while meddling with live electrics.

Finally, children can be clumsy, so it should come as no surprise that 33% and 23% of youngsters, respectively, tumbled down the stairs or fell out of their crib, on at least one occasion in 2020. However, with just 37% of mums and dads committed to installing stair gates and only 34% putting up protective bed barriers, there’s plenty of room for parents to be doing much more to keep their children safer.

Revealed: the most dangerous rooms in the house

Despite often being designed for comfortable lounging, UK parents have named the living room as the most dangerous room in the house; perhaps surprisingly, a startling 42% of children experienced injury here in 2020. Heading outside, the garden also poses danger for unsupervised children, with over a third more (37%) hurting themselves while playing.

Positioned as the third most dangerous area of the house for unsuspecting youngsters, the bedroom saw a third (32%) of children hurt themselves through banging, falling, or tripping in 2020. Meanwhile, sharp corner edges and swinging cupboard doors in the kitchen are responsible for 30% of children heading to the hospital through household injury.

At the other end of the table, hallways (24%), bathrooms (21%), and garages (13%) are considered to be among the least dangerous areas of the house, according to parents, with each responsible for sending less than a quarter of unwary children to A&E in 2020.

Injury prevention top tips

A lot of accidents in the home can easily be avoided, by taking suitable precautions. We’ve outlined our top five injury prevention tips to keep your children safe.

1. Cupboard safety locks

These inexpensive plastic locks will prevent children from opening cupboards and trapping their fingers. These locks also stop children from accessing anything dangerous when you’re not around to keep an eye out.

2. Hob safeguard

Place childproof covers on oven hobs and stoves to prevent nasty burns. Similarly, if you’re cooking on the hob, make sure all handles are facing away from the front to avoid curious children from tipping over a bubbling pan.

3. Electric plug sockets guard

Keep all cables out of reach and insert plastic socket covers to prevent your child from touching electrical outlets.

4. Rubber corner guard

Work surface and table corner points are often head height for an inquisitive youngster. To prevent head bumps and eye injuries, childproof all sharp corner edges with rubber corner guards.

5. Baby gate

Installing baby gates is an efficient way of stopping children from wandering into a room on their own. Having a baby gate allows you to rest easy, knowing your child is safe and out of harm’s way.

Keeping children safe from household danger can be difficult, especially if you’re working throughout the day, but hopefully you’ve picked up a few helpful tips for preventing home-based injuries. For even more expert advice and interesting insight, explore the latest news on our blog.

Accidents at Work: UK at risk of falling behind EU in worker’s rights

According to a recent report by the BBC, the UK is at risk of falling behind the EU when it comes to worker’s rights. The investigation was conducted by the Trade Union Congress (TUC). The union body said the EU had “various initiatives” in the pipeline which would improve standards once they became law. But it said the UK had no similar legislation on the way. This investigation by the TUC, if correct, could have an impact on accidents at work. If you have an accident at work and it is the fault of your employer because they fail to follow procedures, then you may be able to make a claim.

Common workplace hazards can put you at risk, and take you away from the job.

How this can affect accidents at work

If the report by the TUC is correct, then it may not be only worker’s rights that are impacted by companies falling behind. If a company is not adhering to its basic worker’s rights, then they may also not be taking all the steps they can to avoid employees having accidents at work.

The nature of an employee’s work environment may mean they are more likely to have an accident at work, such as jobs in warehouses, building sites and factories. However, this does not mean you can’t suffer an injury in an office environment. But, compared to employees in the construction industry for instance, injuries at work are more prevalent due to its elevated risk whilst working.

Your employer must ensure that you’re working in a safe environment in order to avoid workplace injuries, even if you work in an office. Here are some common workplace injuries that would be a genuine reason   to make an accident at work claim:

  • Electric Shock
  • Eye Injury
  • Head/brain Injuries
  • Fractured/broken bones or dislocated joints
  • Muscle Strains 
  • Slips & Trips – loose carpet, wet floors etc.
  • Falls
  • Exposure to Dangerous Substances
  • Chemical Burns
  • Hearing Damage
  • Falling Object
  • Collisions

Your Employer’s Responsibility

When you are at work, it is your employer’s responsibility to keep you safe. They must adhere to many regulations to ensure they are doing everything they can to avoid accidents and injuries to their employees. These regulations include the Health and Safety Act. it is important that your employer follows these regulations as, not only does it keep you safe, it also ensures that they do not get reprimanded by the Health and Safety Executive.

If employers in the UK are falling behind in their treatment of worker’s rights as the TUC claim, then they are putting their employees at risk of having accidents at work, either through overworking them or not ensuring they are in a safe workspace.

How we can help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accident at work claims. If you have had an accident at work that was due to your employer neglecting their responsibilities, contact us by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Easter Accidents in Public

With the Easter weekend just around the corner, many people will be looking forward to being able to meet people outside again. However, with the long weekend comes a long weekend of walking, which can lead to a rise in Easter weekend accidents in public places such as parks, in children’s play areas and on pavements.

Easter accidents in public

There are a few accidents that can happen over the Easter weekend. Some of these accidents include: slips or trips on pavements whilst out walking, accidents on children’s playgrounds due to faulty or broken playground equipment, and road traffic accidents. And because we can now meet other people outside, accidents in public places may even increase.

Pavement accidents

The most common type of public accidents are slips, trips and falls. These accidents can happen on the pavement, on the road or on public footpaths in parks. They are usually caused by potholes or defects in the ground.

There are certain rules when claiming for tripping on a pothole or defect in a pavement or road. On a pavement, a pothole or defect must be at least an inch deep or raised. In the road, this must be at least 2 inches deep and at least 12 inches wide.

Playground accidents

With many children on their Easter break from school, going to a playground during Easter weekend may be common. If a child has an accident on a playground due to faulty or broken playground equipment, then you may be able to make a claim on their behalf.

The Responsibility of Local Authorities

The Highways Act 1980 states that local authorities are responsible for keeping all roads and footpaths safe to use. Keeping all roads and pavements marble smooth at all times is both unnecessary and impractical. However a council has a legal duty to repair any damage that occurs to surfaces. They must do this by making repairs within six months of being notified of the risk. If a local council does not do this and someone has an accident, then they may be liable.

Road traffic accidents

If you have had a road traffic accident because of someone else’s carelessness on the road, then you may be able to claim compensation.

When you have a road traffic accident, your injuries can be severe. They can range from whiplash and soft tissue damage, to more serious injuries. In the worst cases, they can even be fatal. Even the smallest injuries can take a while to heal after a road traffic accident.

You may have to take time off work to recover, and therefore lose out financially. Your car may have also suffered some damage, and you may even have to replace it. If all of this happened in an accident that was not your fault, then it can be even worse.

How we can help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accidents in public places and on the roads. Contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Retired window cleaner died of asbestos illness

A retired window cleaner died from an industrial disease, according to a recent report. Sidney Curtis, 90, died at his home in Sheringham on December 31 last year. The cause of his death was an asbestos illness; mesothelioma and ischemic heart disease.

At an inquest into his death held at Norfolk Coroner’s Court on Friday, March 26 an assistant coroner for Norfolk, said he was a retired owner of a window cleaning company. The court heard how Mr Curtis had gone to his GP in March 2020, complaining of chest pains that had first developed the previous year. Following a number of tests, Mr Curtis was diagnosed with malignant mesothelioma in April 2020.

In a statement, Lisa Harvey, Mr Curtis’ daughter said her family were not sure when her father had come into contact with asbestos, but it was most likely during his time in the cleaning industry.

Asbestos illness

Asbestos-Related Illness Claims

Asbestos was widely used in the UK as a building material from the 1940s until the 1980s. It was then banned. We now know that Asbestos is incredibly harmful to lung function. Working with asbestos without the right protection can lead to life-shortening illnesses. These include asbestosis, asbestos-induced lung cancer, mesothelioma and pleural thickening. If you or a loved one has an asbestos-related disease, then you may be able to claim.

Mesothelioma Related Illness Claims

Mesothelioma is an extremely aggressive type of cancer. Little or intermittent exposure to asbestos fibres often causes it. Similarly to asbestosis, symptoms include:

  • shortness of breath
  • chest pain
  • coughing
  • weight loss
  • loss of appetite.

The cause of virtually all cases of Mesothelioma is asbestos exposure.

All employers, past and present, owe their staff a duty of care to ensure their working environment is safe and staff are not at risk. You may be able to claim for an asbestos-related illness if you believe your employer failed in their duty of care. For example, if they did not provide you with the correct safety equipment. Another example is if they did not tell you the dangers associated with working with asbestos.

Asbestos-related illnesses take decades to form and often have a life-changing effect on all involved. The law surrounding asbestos illness claims is complex. Therefore, you should get solicitors that specialise in these types of claims.

How we can help with asbestos illness claims

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with a group of select legal firms who specialise in the law surrounding mesothelioma and other asbestos related claims. So contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Electric Scooter Accidents and the Law

Electric scooters have become increasingly popular over the past few years across Europe, and, more recently, the UK. This is largely due to the fact that they are easy to use, portable and environmentally friendly. However, the laws around these scooters are widely unknown, and this can lead to electric scooter accidents.

Electric Scooter Laws

Electric scooters, or E-scooters as they are more commonly known, are common in scooter shares around Europe. This is when a person rents the scooter and is able to use it for a certain amount of time. Whilst there are a couple of cities in the UK that are also piloting the scheme, notably Bristol, Bath and London, most E-scooters in the UK are privately owned. This therefore makes them illegal to use on anything other than private land.

Scooters in the UK are classified as “powered transporters”. This means that they fall under the same legislation as motor vehicles. They would therefore need to meet the same standards under the Road Traffic Act 1988 to be legalised in public. They must be insured, registered with the DVLA and taxed. To use an E scooter on private land, you don’t need to have a valid license or insurance. They are not legal for use on public roads. 

As it stands if you’re caught using a privately-owned electric scooter on public land, you’re liable to receive a £300 fine, 6 points on your license and the possibility of having your scooter confiscated.

When using a rental E scooter as part of the trials, The Met Police have also said that fines and penalty points will be distributed for actions reflecting the laws around driving a motor vehicle. These include:

  • jumping a red light
  • riding on the pavement
  • using a mobile phone
  • surpassing the E scooter speed limit

Electric Scooter Accidents

Due to the fact that E-scooters must meet the same standards as motor vehicles, if you have an accident involving an electric scooter then you may be able to make a claim. If the accident was caused by the person riding the electric scooter, then they may be to blame for the accident.

If you have an electric scooter accident as a passenger then you may be able to make a claim. This is because scooters are not legally allowed to be on public pavements, so they would be to blame for the accident. There are other examples where the person riding the scooter is uninsured or untraceable. In these cases, you may still be able to make a claim. The Motor Insurers’ Bureau was set up especially to deal with compensation claims for people who have had accidents involving uninsured or untraceable drivers.

How we can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes electric scooter accidents and other types of road accidents. Contact us today by filling in our contact form. Or call us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

Plant hire company fined following fatal incident

A specialist plant hire company has been fined after a worker was fatally injured, according to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The worker was undertaking maintenance on a piling rig when the accident happened.

In 2014, Ben Wylie was assisting the Ruislip Plant Ltd Director Mr Noel Kearney with the maintenance of a high-pressure grease track adjusting mechanism at a construction site in Maidenhead. During the process, someone forcibly ejected the grease nipple assembly and a stream of high-pressure grease from the mechanism. This struck Ben Wylie in the shoulder and chest causing fatal injuries.

The Health and Safety Executive investigated the incident. The investigation found that the components were forcibly ejected the day before and were damaged. Once they ejected the fitting, it should not have been refitted. Despite this, Mr Kearney attempted to modify and refit the grease nipple and adaptor to the high-pressure system. He then began to re-pressurise the tracks by pumping in grease using a hand operated grease gun. The pressure built in the system and at a critical point they then ejected the components. The plant should have done a pressure test with all suitable safeguards in these circumstances. However there was no safe system of work during this. It resulted in the modifications to the grease gun bringing Ben Wylie into the danger zone.

Ruislip Plant Ltd pleaded guilty to breaching Section 3(1) of the Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. The plant hire company was fined £99,000 and had to pay costs of £116, 973.36.

Your Employer’s Responsibility in Accidents at Work

Your employer is responsible for keeping you safe at work. They must make sure that they meet the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999). The way they do this is by conducting risk assessments to ensure that everyone is kept safe. Employers must make sure that they do everything possible to avoid staff having accidents whilst at work.

If you are self-employed, you may still be able to claim. A lot of on-site workers often work on a contractor basis. This means that there is still a company that they are working for. If the business fails in their duty to keep you safe, then they may be responsible for your accident.

The Health and Safety Executive said the following about the accident. “This incident could have been avoided if Ruislip Plant Ltd had undertaken a risk assessment and devised a safe system of work.

“That failure to adhere to the correct procedure for pressure testing was directly causative of this incident. Ruislip Plant Limited put no control measures in place by Ruislip Plant Limited and that sadly led to the death of Ben Wylie.”

Plant Hire Company Fined: How We Can Help with Accidents at Work

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of personal injury claims. This includes accidents at work. Contact us by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

The Workplace Safety Index

The rate of accident and injury in the workplace is gradually slowing down YoY, yet there are still areas of great concern for businesses moving forward. Notably, we can reveal that an astonishing 37% of workers have had an accident at work, likely contributed to by one-in-ten Brits never being given safety training. All factors considered, the average UK employee rates their workplace just 7.5/10 for safety. 

Naturally, there are also incidents that go unaddressed, and only a third (34%) of Brits feel comfortable filing an accident report. Subsequently, nearly a quarter (23%) are hesitant to file a report for fear of taking time off work, 22% worry about getting in trouble, and one-in-five are anxious about completing paperwork.  

In terms of COVID era concerns, just 37% of Brits believe their employer takes social distancing seriously and 39% have felt unsafe at work during the pandemic. Meanwhile, only half (52%) of UK employees have been distributed sufficient workplace personal protective equipment (PPE) to combat the pandemic.  

But how do workers from each British industry and sector stand on the matter of safety? 

Agriculture  

With a safety score of just 6.6 out of 10, Brits consider agriculture to be the most dangerous industry. Supporting this notion, well over half (59%) of the sector’s employee base has experienced accident or injury while on the farm. Workplace machinery is the largest concern for farmers fearing a farm accident, given a safety score of just 5.4, while stability of flooring and building conditions score 6 and 6.4, respectively.  

Astonishingly, despite outside working being par for the course, just over one-in-ten (15%) agriculture workers feel social distancing has been taken seriously during the ongoing pandemic, while PPE distribution scored just 6.6. 

Healthcare 

Despite being more impacted than most during the pandemic, healthcare professionals don’t believe their industry (7.9) has distributed PPE as well as hospitality workers (8.1) do theirs. Addressing another COVID concern, over half (53%) of hospital staff believe social distancing has been all but ignored.

In terms of practical danger, intricate medical machinery (7.5) ranks among the safest of UK workplace equipment, while the standard of flooring (7.8) and infrastructure (8) is also high performing. Incredibly, despite ranking reasonably for overall safety (7.5), a third (34%) of healthcare workers have experienced an accident or injury on the job.  

Hospitality  

The staggering statistic to come out of the hospitality industry is just how many workers (42%) have injured themselves while performing their role, despite the industry being perceived to be among the safest (7.6). Similarly, the overall condition of machinery (7.7), flooring (8), and infrastructure (8.2) is also thought of as relatively safe. 

Despite the efficient distribution of PPE (8.1), hospitality workers are a little hung up on how seriously their employers have taken social distancing, with 61% believing more could be done to tackle COVID. 

Office work 

There’s no safer place to work than the office, according to our research, as just 16% of nine-to-fivers have experienced an accident at their desk. Similarly, the office is perceived to be one of the least dangerous places to work (7.6), bettered only by the classroom (7.8). 

Focussing on the environment’s specifics, no other workplace features safer equipment (7.7), while overall flooring (8) and infrastructure (8.2) are also among the UK’s best-in-class. Meanwhile, however, office workers are well within their rights to have COVID concerns, with PPE distribution (7.5) far from the standard set by hospitality, and over half of staff (54%) believing management should take social distance rules more seriously.  

Public service 

Despite a third (36%) of public servants suffering an accident at work at some point in their career, the industry has a slightly above-average perceived safety value (7.4). Addressing the day-to-day, equipment and relevant machinery (7.4) ranks similarly, while the perception of flooring (7.8) and infrastructure (7.6) follows a similar pattern. 

COVID-wise, public servants are a little concerned, with less than half (42%) of sector workers feeling their employer treats social distancing seriously. However, they can take some comfort in PPE distribution across the industry being ranked as reasonably efficient (7.7). 

Retail 

As far as retail workers are concerned, their job is among the least safe in the country (7.3), with just warehousing (7) and agriculture (6.6) worse off. And with 40% of the industry’s workforce having experienced an instance of injury at some point, there’s little room for argument.  

Importantly, equipment is considered far from safe (7), with, again, only warehouse (6.9) and agriculture machinery (5.4) ranked more dangerous. Meanwhile, though, the state of flooring (7.6) and infrastructure (7.7) each rank a little more impressively.  

Looking at the contemporary issue of COVID compliance, only a third (35%) of employees feel social distancing is taken seriously, while PPE distribution (7.5) has thus far been relatively underwhelming. 

Education  

Designed as an area of wellbeing for children of all ages, you’d expect nothing less than exceptional safety in the classroom (7.8), so it’s no surprise it tops our index as the most highly thought of workplace for safety. Classroom flooring (8) also tops the charts, joint with that of offices and restaurants. Meanwhile, equipment and apparatus scores slightly lower (7.4). Strikingly, however, a third (32%) of teachers have admitted to experiencing an accident or injury during their career. 

When it comes to COVID, the classroom has been hit as hard as any other workplace, but PPE distribution in schools (7.2) is among the worst of any sector. Similarly, 62% of teachers feel social distancing hasn’t been enforced sufficiently, although the practical application could be tricky given the energetic and lively nature of children. 

Transport and logistics 

Due to the vehicular nature of the job, it’s unsurprising that transport workers consider their day-to-day machinery among the least safe of all industries (7), behind only warehousing (6.9) and agriculture (5.4).  

Despite the overall condition of flooring (7.5) and infrastructure (7.8) perceived to be slightly better, the working environment (7.3) is perceived to be marginally more dangerous than the average industry, supported by an astonishing 46% of employees suffering injury on the job.  

In relation to COVID safety concerns, workers are generally satisfied with the distribution of PPE (7.8), although just 34% feel their boss or manager has taken social distancing seriously throughout the pandemic.  

Warehousing 

Warehousing is widely regarded as one of the more dangerous industries (7), with agriculture (6.6) the only sector considered less safe. Focussing on the practicalities of the job, warehouse machinery such as forklift trucks are far from fool proof (6.9), while flooring (7.3) and infrastructure (7.6) also rank among the least safe across all sectors.  

COVID-wise, things don’t improve, either; warehouse management is up there with the worst for enforcing social distancing, with just 34% of the employee base happy with their efforts, and PPE distribution (7.5) is simply average compared to most other industries.  

However, despite worker sentiment all pointing in one direction, the reality is that only 30% of staff have experienced an accident or injury at work, which ranks the warehouse as safer than all workplaces but the office. 

Compiling workplace data from real employees, we’ve managed to reveal which UK industries are the safest, and which are, indeed, the most dangerous for workplace accidents. For even more expert debate and advice around the subject of workplace safety, enjoy exploring the latest on our blog

Accidents at Work for Non-Permanent Staff

Accidents at work can be bad for anyone; having to take time off work when you can not afford it and worrying about work can be stressful. This can be made worse if you have had an accident at a workplace where you are not a permanent member of staff. However, your employer has the same amount of responsibility to an agency or temporary worker as they do to a permanent member of staff.

So if you have had an accident at work as a non-permanent staff member and it was someone else’s fault, then you may still be able to claim compensation.

If you have had an accident whilst working for an agency, temporary contract or sub-contract, you have the same right to claim as a permanent employee. Employers have a duty of care to everyone who is working for the company, including agency staff. Agency staff must have the adequate site induction when starting at a new company. Agency staff must also have the same level of training as a permanent employee would have, and the same risk assessments must also be carried out.

Accidents at Work for Non-Permanent Staff: Your Employer’s Responsibility

It is your employer’s responsibility to keep you safe at work. They must make sure you have the correct training and equipment to be able to do your job correctly. Risk assessments must also be carried out, to ensure the job is done safely. Your employer must follow the Health and Safety at work Regulations.

If your employer has not followed the guidelines to keep you safe at work, or has done so incorrectly, you may be able to claim compensation. We understand that you may feel uneasy about claiming against your employer, however all employers must have employer’s liability insurance. This covers the costs of accidents at work. It is the insurance which would pay the compensation, so your employer would not be directly out of pocket.

Risk Assessments

Industries where non-permanent staff members are common include construction sites, warehouses and production. All of these industries can be dangerous, and require risk assessments. Risk assessments are vital in ensuring that accidents do not happen. The employer is responsible for completing risk assessments. This makes sure that all employees who undertake the job do so safely.

During a risk assessment, your employer takes into consideration factors such as; training needs, the amount of people required to lift the object safely if it is manual handling, how many people are needed to do the job safely, the safety of the equipment being used (if any) and if there are any specific needs to the job, for example machinery or protective clothing.

How We Can Help with Accidents at Work for Non-Permanent Staff

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience dealing with all manner of accident at work claims. This includes claiming if you have had an accident as a non-permanent staff member. Contact us today by filling in our contact form, or by calling us on 01614138765 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.

What Are Public Liability Accidents?

Public liability accidents are accidents where a public entity is liable for the accident. This is commonly the council. The accidents usually happen on the street, on the roads and in public places such as parks. Accidents in shops and supermarkets do not fall under public liability, as they are privately owned. Therefore, they are occupier’s liability.

Public Liability Accidents

The most common type of public liability accidents are slips, trips and falls. These accidents can happen on the pavement, on the road or on public footpaths in parks. They are usually caused by potholes or defects in the ground.

There are certain rules when claiming for tripping on a pothole or defect in a pavement or road. On a pavement, a pothole or defect must be at least an inch deep or raised. In the road, this must be at least 2 inches deep and at least 12 inches wide.

The Responsibility of Local Authorities

The Highways Act 1980 states that local authorities are responsible for keeping all roads and footpaths safe to use. Keeping all roads and pavements marble smooth at all times is both unnecessary and impractical. However a council has a legal duty to repair any damage that occurs to surfaces. They must do this by making repairs within six months of being notified of the risk. If a local council does not do this and someone has an accident, then they may be liable.

If You Have Had A Public Liability Accident

When you have an accident due to a defect in the road or pavement, it is important that you take photos of the defect. This will help with your case, as it can be proof of the defect in a claim. If you have an accident and you have information about the defect, then it can be helpful to note this down too. Details include how long the defect has been there, how often the local council repair defects, and if other people have had accidents in the same place. If the accident was previously reported, how long it took the council to fix the defect, and if they actually did fix it.

It is important that you report the defect to the council so that they are aware of the defect. They also need to be aware so that they can fix any defects. However, if you wish to make a personal injury claim, you should not try and claim directly with the council. This is because if you have already tried to claim from the council and they deny liability, then it is unlikely that they will accept liability if you start a personal injury claim.

How We Can Help

Here at The Compensation Experts we work with solicitors who have years of experience in all manner of personal injury claims. This includes slips trips and falls in public places. Contact us today by filling in our contact form or by calling us on 0800 182 2185 to speak to one of our friendly knowledgeable advisors.